first_imgChelsea have rung the changes as expected for the FA Cup fourth-round derby with Brentford, who have chosen to leave transfer target Scott Hogan on the bench.Cesar Azpilicueta and Pedro are the only two survivors from the Chelsea team that beat Hull last weekend.Asmir Begovic, wanted by Bournemouth, starts in goal for the Blues, while captain John Terry returns to the back three alongside Kurt Zouma and Nathan Ake, making his first Chelsea appearance since May 2015.Nathaniel Chalobah and Ruben Loftus-Cheek also start, as does Michy Batshuayi.Brentford have made one change with Yoann Barbet coming in at left wing-back for Tom Field.Former Chelsea youngster Josh McEachran starts on his return to Stamford Bridge, but West Ham transfer target Hogan is only among the substitutes.Chelsea: Begovic; Zouma, Terry, Azpilicueta; Pedro, Chalobah, Fabregas, Ake; Willian, Batshuayi, Loftus-Cheek.Subs: Eduardo, Ivanovic, Moses, Matic, Kenedy, Hazard, Costa. Brentford: Bentley; Egan, Dean, Bjelland; Colin, McEachran, Woods, Yennaris, Barbet; Sawyers; Vibe.Subs: Bonham, Field, Clarke, Kerschbaumer, Jota, Hofmann, Hogan.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgVacaville >> PGA Teaching Professional Ron Kuwata, from The Links at Rolling Hills in Corning, was recognized with the 2017 Northern California PGA Patriot Award recently. The Patriot Award is presented to PGA Professionals who personify patriotism and demonstrate unwavering commitment and dedication to those who have valiantly served and protected the United States, according to a press release issued by the NCPGA. Kuwata has dedicated much time and effort into working with area veterans via …last_img read more

first_imgPut a string of amino acids into this magic box, and it comes out all precisely folded into a protein.  How does it do it?  A molecular machine described by Science Daily has scientists baffled.  Ironically, its name is TRiC.    TRiC is a chaperonin, a member of a class of molecular machines that “chaperone” or guide polypeptides emerging from the ribosome (the translation machine, 02/21/2007) into their final folded shape.  The shape of a protein is essential to its function.  Most polypeptides find their native fold without help, but about 10% need a chaperonin shelter, like a private dressing room (05/05/2003) to get in shape.    The article shows that TRiC looks like a barrel-shaped box with two lids.  Each lid opens and closes like the iris of a camera.  Scientists can’t see what goes on inside when the box is closed.  The press release explains,TRiC, like all chaperonins, consists of a double-ringed structure that gives it a barrel shape.  One ring opens to admit the raw protein into the inner recesses of the folding machine, then closes tightly while, inside the chaperonin “black box,” the mysteries of molecular origami unfold—or, more correctly, fold.  Upon completion of the folding, the ring at the other end opens up to push out the finished product.    “It is really like a nanomachine.  It closes off, the protein is trapped inside and something—we don’t understand what—happens inside this chamber, and the protein comes out folded,” Frydman said.  “It is a very complex mechanism.”What’s remarkable about this cellular magic trick is that there are many more possible incorrect folds than the right one.  How this machine can fold each protein correctly, like solving a Rubik’s Cube in the dark without hands, is one of those mysteries of life science is trying to unlock.  It’s not just the shape of the box that matters.  The two iris-like lids have to open at the right time, and keep the protein inside the right amount of time, or it doesn’t work and the product comes out misfolded.    Judith Frydman at Stanford discovered TRiC in 1992 and has been trying to figure it out ever since.  Co-director of the Center for Protein Folding Machinery, Frydman describes TRiC as a “two-stroke motor” wherein the opening of one end is linked to the closing of the other end.  “What has been so intriguing is that everything is connected,“ she said.  “This is a very large machine and every part of the machine is communicating with the other parts.”At first her team thought the machine opened like the flaps on a cardboard box, but then they discovered the iris-shutter mechanism.  She thinks the twisting of the lid transfers rotational motion to the interior and this helps the folding process, but so far the secret is still hidden inside.    If Frydman and her team figure out the TRiC, new medical advances may be forthcoming.  She said, “If one could understand what the environment in there looks like, what this machine does, what the cell does to fold its proteins, then we could begin to design ways to fold proteins for therapeutic purposes.”  This implies design following design.  In fact, no mention of evolution or natural selection was made in the press release, originally published by the Stanford University news service.  The chaperonin is called a machine eight times in the brief article.This science project needs evolutionary theory like a fly needs a swatter.  Tell us, Charlie, how the protein machinery that codes, transcribes, translates and folds proteins originated without the machinery to do it.  We want scientific facts, not stories.    Magic tricks intrigue us, not because we think real magic is happening, but because we want to know how the trick is done.  TRiC is inspiring Frydman and her colleagues to reverse-engineer the implicit design of this complex black box and put their findings to practical use for improving human health and well being.  Isn’t that what science is all about?    Surely no one from Darwin’s day through the 1950s could have imagined that the secrets of life would depend on complex, precision machinery, with moving parts, made out of molecules, manufactured to spec from coded instructions.  Enough reports like this one, and Darwinism itself will be interred in a black box: coffin-shaped and nailed shut, so the folding of rigor mortis inside won’t gross anyone out.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img1.  Prud’homme et al, “Body plan innovation in treehoppers through the evolution of an extra wing-like appendage,” Nature Volume: 473 (05 May 2011), pp. 83�86, doi:10.1038/nature09977.By making evolution mean anything, they make it mean everything – and therefore nothing.  By creating an illusion of progress, evolutionists have created the perfect conspiracy: a way to snow the public under the banner of science, using the Stuff Happens Law (SHL).  Philosophers may realize that “stuff happens” amounts to a failure of scientific explanation, but by calling it something more sophisticated – evolution – evolutionists can tinker with it in countless ways.  Being inherently flexible, the Stuff Happens Law lends itself to endless corollaries that can be couched in Darwinian jargon.Strange stuff happens (evolutionary reversal)Stuff happens at any speed (evolutionary stasis or radiation)Stuff happens by surprise (evolutionary innovation)Stuff re-happens (circular evolution)Stuff survives happenstance (living fossils)Stuff makes other stuff happen (humans affecting biology by “unnatural selection”)As long as creative minds inhabit evolutionary biology labs, the future looks bright for endless twists on Darwin’s tale.  Whether this amounts to science is an entirely different question. (Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Evolution is a strange theory; it goes forwards, backwards, sideways and nowhere, fast or slow, up or down, inside out and outside in.  Here are some examples that contradict the slow, gradual picture of progress that was so popular in Victorian England.Re-using lost genes:  Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are claiming that evolution dug into an old bag of tricks and pulled out something lost 200 years ago.  “Ever since Charles Darwin proposed his theory of evolution in 1859, scientists have wondered whether evolutionary adaptations can be reversed,” the press release from MIT News said.  Examples have been the re-evolution of wings in insects (see 05/28/2003).    Using a computational model, Jeff Gore at the university decided that evolution can reverse itself, but only if fewer than four mutations were involved.  He studied bacteria that achieved resistance to an antibiotic named cefotaxime.  It took five mutations to confer resistance; there were 120 ways to get all five, but only 18 could actually occur, he found.    The article did not get back to the question of how insects could re-evolve wings – a reversal that would seem to involve many more than four mutations.  It also repeated the discredited idea that the human appendix is no longer needed.Going nowhere:  New Scientist announced in a bold headline, “Horsetail fossil tells tale of plant evolution.”  But when the reader looks for said evolution, there is none to be found except a tale indeed.  Alan Channing [Cardiff U] found a fossilized horsetail that must have been preserved in a hot spring environment.  It looks modern: “Though a new species, the fossilised plant is quite similar to some horsetails living today with a single upright evergreen shaft,” the article confessed.  While admitted that horsetails have had a “contested evolutionary history” that Channing’s work now “clears up,” the article went on to say that “The findings suggest horsetails experienced only modest innovations in their long evolutionary history.”    Innovations?  The article presented no evidence of ancestors of horsetails.  Worse, Channing’s study pushes the origin of modern-looking horsetails back another 14 million years, to 150 million years before the present.  The fossil preserved “not only stems but also leaf sheaths, roots and reproductive structures.”  It’s as if this plant popped into existence 150 million years ago and never dreamt up any new innovations all the way to the present except, if anything, the older ones were bigger and better: “Today’s horsetail plants are living fossils, the only surviving members of the class Equisetopsida, the article ended.  “For more than a 100 million years, Equisetopsida plants dominated the understory of the late Mesozoic period forests, stretching up to 30 metres high.”Evolution in reverse:  PhysOrg tells us that cicada-like insects called treehoppers cast aside their front wings 200 million years ago, only to call them up into service as headgear.  “That’s probably shocking news if you are an entomologist, and challenges some very basic ideas about what makes an insect an insect, the researchers said.”    Strange things happen in evolution.  “But then, some 50 million years ago, something strange happened to the cicada-like treehoppers: they once again sprouted wing-like structures from the top of the first segment of the thorax.”  But they didn’t flap: “Some of these wildly divergent extrusions resemble thorns, others look like antlers, and still others like aggressive ants or animal droppings, creating one of Nature’s most exotic menageries.”  It wasn’t clear if the capitalized Nature referred to the outdoors or the journal Nature, where the study made the cover story.1     What does this mean for evolutionary theory?  “Evolution is usually described as linear, but these modified wings suggested the process had come full circle.”  Turning evolution into a personified inventor, French biologist Benjamin Prud’homme said, “This extra pair of wings was not needed for flight, but nor did it prevent it.  So it became raw material for evolution to play with.”  A co-author said that the study shows “how development abilities can be lost or silenced over millions of years, only to be redeployed to contribute to the evolution of a complex and beautiful appendage.”  The abstract of the Nature paper remarked, “This innovation in the insect body plan is an unprecedented situation in 250 Myr of insect evolution.”  The paper claimed this required no new genetic information: “We submit that morphological innovations can arise from the deployment of existing but silenced developmental potentials, therefore requiring not so much the evolution of new genetic material but instead the expression of these potentials.”Evolution in hiding:  Biologists who study fungi have found an embarrassing surprise: according to PhysOrg, “a hitherto unknown type of fungi which has fundamentally expanded the scientific understanding of this group of organisms.”  A British team has uncovered a whole new group of fungi which they named cryptomycota – hidden fungi.Dr Tom Richards, from the University of Exeter’s Biosciences department and the Natural History Museum London, said: “This study has been very surprising – not least because the original sample came from the nearby pond.  Fungi have been well studied for 150 years and it was thought we had a good understanding of the major evolutionary groups, but these findings have changed that radically.    “Current understanding of fungal diversity turns out to be only half the story – we’ve discovered this diverse and deep evolutionary branch in fungi that has remained hidden all this time.”Cryptomycota apparently lack a rigid cell wall.  What does this mean?  The article referred to the fungus as either an “intermediate state” or a “living fossil,” but admitted that it must be successful: “Despite lacking the tough cell wall, they seem still to be very successful in the environment because of their extensive diversity and cosmopolitan distribution.”  The discovery also points out that biologists may be oblivious to large segments of the living world: “Until recent years, researchers investigating microbial diversity have sampled by growing microbes in lab cultures, but now it seems that the vast majority of life forms are never captured using these methods – meaning most of the evolutionary complexity of life remains unsampled.”Evolution by loss:  A lizard in Cambodia has no legs or eyes.  The BBC News has a picture of what looks like an earthworm, but is a “legless lizard” that has also lost its eyes.  Uncommon Descent teased about “Evolution as loss of function.”Unnatural selection:  What would you call “unnatural selection”?  Would it be synonymous with intelligent design?  Not according to Michael Le Page at New Scientist, who has been writing a series about how humans are harming the environment with their pesticides, hunting, climate change, pollution, diseases, and shuffling of invasive species.  He left begging the question of whether humans were naturally selected to do this.last_img read more

first_imgOur mission is to inspire young people and ignite their passion, this is mostly for rural communities.We are currently assisting a school in Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape to rebuild their mud structure. So fare, we have starte by assisted in starting a veggie garden, planting trees, soup kitchen equipment, four codes sporting equipment, etcWe are in need of more sponsors to assist with the building material and also with skills transfer training in equiping the young people that have volunteer in rebuiding the school.Secondly, early 2013 we will launch an award to encourage and recognise young and mostly people who assist and encourage rural young people to dream of a brighter future for themselves and their communitues.We need assistance and partners for our “OVULINDLELA AWARDS’.Contact person: Nikelwa BvumbiTelephone: 082 392 3021Address: 2 Moolenberg Road, Rondebosch, 7700E-mail: [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Announcements#cloud Eucalyptus Systems, a Santa Barbara based startup, announced today it has closed a $20 million round of funding. Led by new investor New Enterprise Associates (NEA) with participation from current investors Benchmark Capital and BV Capital, this is the second round of funding for the open source private cloud software provider, bringing its total capital raised to date to $25.5 million. Eucalyptus provides software that allows organizations to deploy private and hybrid cloud computing environments within a secure IT infrastructure. Eucalyptus supports the same APIs as public clouds and boasts full compatibility with the Amazon Web Services infrastructure, addressing interoperability and facilitating the movement of data between public and private. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… audrey watters 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The software is available in two editions: Eucalyptus Open Source and the recently release Enterprise Edition.The company says that today’s VC funding will be used to scale development, marketing and sales, and Eucalyptus hopes to meet the increasing demand for cost-efficient and scalable infrastructure solutions that address enterprise needs for both private and hybrid clouds. Although Eucalyptus took an early lead in this space, there has been substantial activity in this area lately, with the recent launch of Nimbula for example. Related Posts last_img read more

first_imgLATEST STORIES Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Teammates in a few minutes? @TheSMBeermen #PBADraft2017 pic.twitter.com/HyTRoJmJX2— Randolph B. Leongson (@RLeongsonINQ) October 29, 2017Fajardo knows the acquisition of Standhardinger makes San Miguel a much more dangerous team but he doesn’t want to get too far ahead of himself and the Beermen have not done anything yet at this point.“It’s not that easy to win. You have to take it one game at a time, one conference at a time. I hope he could really help us win not only games, but also championships,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 NBA: 76ers rookie Fultz out indefinitelycenter_img MOST READ CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort “We’re glad that we got him. I believe that he could be a huge contributor for us to help us win games and hopefully the championships,” he said.READ: Standhardinger ‘very excited’ to play with Fajardo at SMBFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutFajardo, though, admitted that the only concern is how Standhardinger would fit in with the Beermen’s system considering that won’t suit up until midway through the conference due to his commitments with Hong Kong in the Asean Basketball League.“Of course, it’s important to him to adapt to coach’s system. We already have something set with our team and he has to find a way to fit right in,” he said. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion June Mar Fajardo. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netJune Mar Fajardo may have only played a couple of minutes together with No. 1 overall pick Christian Standhardinger in the 2017 Fiba Asia Cup, but he’s convinced that his fellow Gilas Pilipinas mainstay will help San Miguel Beer in a lot of ways.“He’ll bring the hustle and energy. He can really help us because you already know what he’s capable of, which is high on rebounding,” Fajardo said in Filipino.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more

JaVale McGee has gone a long way toward shedding the persona he got from “Shaqtin’ a Fool,” the TV blooper segment on which he held residency for years. Coming off consecutive NBA titles with Golden State, the 7-footer is currently logging career highs in points and blocks per game with the Lakers while serving as a full-time starter for the first time since 2011-12. Not bad considering the collective confusion when he agreed to a deal to join LeBron James in Los Angeles.But for all the improvement he’s shown as a mainstay in this lineup, the 30-year-old still has an Achilles’ heel when it comes to his defense: McGee remains the league’s supreme goaltender.As of Wednesday, McGee had been called for goaltending an NBA-high 13 times, nearly twice as many as Orlando rookie Mo Bamba, who ranks second in the league with seven violations. The Knicks, who also have 13 goaltending violations, are the only team that’s been called as many times as McGee himself, according to PBP Stats, which tracks a wide array of advanced NBA statistics. But this is nothing new for McGee: Since his rookie year, he has somehow managed to lead the NBA in goaltending violations per 100 possessions in each of the eight seasons in which he logged at least 400 minutes of playing time.With 214 goaltends in his career,1This includes 11 in the postseason. including one season when he logged a league-high 55, there have obviously been some true head-scratchers. One violation in 2012 was particularly egregious: The ball was in clear, undeniable descent before McGee launched it, volleyball-style, into the stands 25 or so feet in the air.Puzzling as they might be from time to time for his coaches, the goaltending calls probably aren’t that big of a deal. Getting called for something that costs his club 2 points — 2 points they might have surrendered anyway — is arguably small potatoes compared with the upside of blocking a shot. And that’s likely even more true of McGee, who this year has blocked 5.3 shots for every goaltending violation.But McGee’s willingness to lunge at nearly every shot attempt the way a cat flails at a laser pointer can cost his team in other ways. His block attempts often hurt the Laker defense more than if he had simply stayed on the ground. Take a late October game against the Spurs, when McGee committed three shooting fouls — resulting in seven San Antonio free throw attempts in a 1-point defeat — that stemmed from him ramming into jump-shooters. Twice, LaMarcus Aldridge pump-faked McGee into the air, knowing his constant tendency to go for blocks. (DeMar DeRozan did the same thing to McGee when the Lakers visited San Antonio.) Over the past two seasons, McGee has posted the second-highest foul rate when it comes to big men bumping into jump-shooters, according to data from Second Spectrum.2Among those with at least 10 such fouls. Only Portland’s Zach Collins has a higher foul rate in such scenarios.Video Playerhttps://fivethirtyeight.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/JaVale1.mp400:0000:0000:55Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.While McGee may not have the greatest on-court instincts, the reason he attempts to block so many shots is simple: He thinks he’s capable of cleanly blocking them all. He’s highly athletic — remember the dunk contest in which he jammed on two side-by-side rims at the same time? — and at one point McGee owned the largest wingspan in the entire league, at more than 7-foot-6.“That’s something [the referees are] not used to seeing,” McGee said of a particularly ridiculous block, when he caught the ball with one hand — and appeared to do so cleanly — but was whistled for goaltending anyway.“I think he tries to be spectacular,” then-Nuggets coach George Karl said in 2013 when asked about McGee’s game. “Basketball is a game of possession after possession of doing things the right way, doing your job and letting the spectacular come. I think JaVale tries to find the spectacular and forces the spectacular when if … you just let us orchestrate the game, something big-time will happen.”Another prolific rim protector, Tyson Chandler, sized up McGee’s game nearly eight years ago in a post from a Wizards blog. Chandler presciently said the then-Wizards center needed “to understand how he can be effective,” and that he would learn that by playing with more established veterans. McGee gained that experience with Golden State — and now Chandler is backing up McGee with the Lakers.McGee has been a force this season. He’s been a top-10 rim protector3Among players who’ve logged at least 15 games and who have defended five shots or more from inside of 6 feet per game. so far, holding opponents more than 10 points beneath their averages from inside of 6 feet, according to NBA Advanced Stats. In large part because of their play at center, the Lakers rank fifth in the league in opponent field-goal percentage inside 3 feet and ninth in overall defensive efficiency. And while there were once questions about McGee’s basic fundamentals, those concerns have largely evaporated. Just look at last year’s NBA Finals, when McGee played incredibly solid defense after being switched onto LeBron.What will be worth watching on Thursday, when the Lakers play foul-drawing maestro James Harden and the Rockets, and this postseason4If Los Angeles makes it. is whether McGee can avoid being baited by fakes. If savvy teams like the Spurs already know to test his ability to stay on the ground, it’s almost a given that other teams will try it in a series.In a way, the key to the Lakers rising to become true contenders could very well be based on McGee’s ability to stay grounded on defense.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

OSU redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker (24) returns his second interception of the day during the second half of Buckeyes’ season opener on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorListed as a starting safety for Ohio State on Saturday and donning a scarlet No. 24 jersey, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker made his first impression in front of a crowd of 107,193 in Ohio Stadium.OSU coach Urban Meyer called him a “freakish” athlete, which showed on Saturday, midway through the first half.Hooker sprinted over to the opposing team’s sideline with redshirt freshman Damon Arnette defending Bowling Green senior wide receiver Ronnie Moore. Hooker jumped off of one foot, tipped the ball with his right hand and came down with the interception — which was one of the highlights of the first weekend of college football.Hooker displayed his “ball hawk” mentality again when he snatched his second interception of the day.But Hooker’s path to the centerfold of Meyer’s secondary was an unorthodox one filled with adversity, and he has his mom to thank for that.Hooker was a basketball star at New Castle High School in Pennsylvania where he was named to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s Fabulous Five basketball team in 2012-2013. Hooker’s team was 54-2 combined in his sophomore and junior seasons in high school.He was a rising high school prospect sought by Division I schools, but when he entered his junior year, he returned to the game of football — one he had not played since suffering a shoulder injury in seventh grade.Hooker’s talent on the hardwood translated almost immediately to the gridiron as he was rated as a four-star prospect and the No. 26 athlete overall by 247Sports. Meyer said when he was recruiting him, Hooker scored 35 points in a basketball game his junior season.When Hooker arrived on campus in 2014, he had to take a redshirt and sit out a year. At the time, it wasn’t a situation Hooker was familiar with.“There were a couple times where I thought this wasn’t for me.” Hooker said. “I just started doubting myself because I felt like I didn’t fit in.”Hooker said he had several talks with his mom, Angela Dennis, while he was going through his redshirt season.“I don’t know what you’re going to do, but you’re not coming home,” Hooker said Dennis told him.Although Hooker said he was just blowing smoke at the time, in hindsight, he’s thankful for his mother’s advice.“My mom, she’s like my everything. Growing up, that’s all I had,” he said. “I learned a lot from my mom. Being a single parent, she taught me that no matter what you’re going through, just fight through what you’re doing, because there is going to be adversity.”Meyer estimates that between 95 and 99 percent of freshmen in college football experience what Hooker went through when redshirting. He said that Dennis is someone he should thank for encouraging Hooker to stay with the Buckeyes.Now, Meyer is reaping the rewards.Hooker said he gained his confidence when he saw results in the weight room. He said he began to see his body transform into the role he was expected to fill. He said he studied more film, learned the playbook and earned the trust of his teammates and his coaching staff.Hooker’s performance against the Falcons might have been the peak of a grind that started with doubt and culminated with his first two interceptions for the Scarlet and Gray.“I feel like my redshirt year definitely helped me fit into the environment more,” he said. “It definitely helped me bulk my body up and play out there with the Big Ten conference.”Hooker believes that a redshirt year can be taken one of two ways. The player can take it and get frustrated, or he can put the work into fine-tuning his game and benefit from a full year of development.Hooker will be asked to do more on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the ‘Shoe against a prolific passing team in Tulsa. However, Meyer believes in Hooker’s basketball and athletic background to lead the OSU defense.“He can do whatever he trains to do. He’s talented. He’s fast. He has great ball skills,” Meyer said following the team’s 77-10 victory over Bowling Green. “His commitment to our program now is over the top.” read more

With the Ohio State women’s basketball team on the verge of missing its first NCAA tournament berth since coach Jim Foster’s arrival in 2002, the possibility of coming up short is starting to sink in for the Buckeyes. However, it’s not the possible absence from the tourney that has shaken the team most, but rather the coming to terms with losing its star senior guard, Tayler Hill, at the conclusion of this season. Hill is averaging 21.1 points per game, which leads all scorers in the Big Ten. “I think (Hill) deserves to be one of the best players in the country despite the team’s record this year,” said Ohio State redshirt senior guard Amber Stokes. The Buckeyes (14-10, 4-7 Big Ten) have been plagued by illnesses and injuries all season long, which are partly to blame for the 4-7 record in conference play. Yet even in times of trial, Hill’s performance on the court has rarely faltered. Following a 68-45 win against Indiana on Jan. 17, Foster said “Hill didn’t have her legs,” from being ill in the days before the game. Hill, though, still managed to keep Hoosiers’ standout senior forward Aulani Sinclair to five points on 2-for-15 shooting. “She is a hard worker and will do anything it takes to help this team to be successful,” Stokes said. Hill’s hard work and dedication to the game can be traced back to her basketball days at South High School in Minneapolis, Minn. Hill ended her four-year varsity career as Minnesota’s all-time leading scorer (boy or girl) with 3,888 points. After graduating from OSU, Hill said she wants to play in the WNBA and play basketball overseas. Foster said he believes Hill is going to be a high draft choice. “She’s a very good defensive player,” Foster said. “I think her versatility really makes her a valuable attribute. She can score, she can play the point, and she can play from the perimeter … All those things are a big deal to a coach.” While Hill said she would love to play on any team in the WNBA, she would prefer to play in Minnesota. “Playing at home would be great because of family,” Hill said. Hill’s native WNBA team, the Minnesota Lynx, are regarded as one of the top teams in the league, especially with the recent addition of former Connecticut standout Maya Moore. The Buckeyes, though, will likely have big shoes to fill with the loss of Hill. But Foster is assured that the offseason will serve as an opportunity to get better. “There are a number of candidates that are going to play for that position,” Foster said. After losing to Nebraska, 58-39, Thursday night in Lincoln, Neb., the Buckeyes are set to play Minnesota Feb. 21 at the Schottenstein Center. read more