JUNEAU, Alaska — Gov. Mike Dunleavy is proposing a fiscal plan that includes sweeping cuts and providing Alaska residents with a full payout from the oil-wealth fund, and many residents are unhappy about it.The annual check paid to qualified residents was capped the past three years as state leaders struggled to address an ongoing budget deficit now estimated at $1.6 billion.Dunleavy campaigned on wanting to get residents their full payout. Now that he’s governor, they’re learning what that means.He has proposed cuts to a range of services, along with tax collection changes that municipal officials say would devastate some local governments.Some see this as a manufactured crisis that doesn’t consider taxes and too highly prizes the dividend over government services.Dunleavy says the problem is spending, not the dividend.Becky Bohrer, The Associated Press read more

Updated:A man in his 20’s has been arrested after police investigated reports of shots being fired inside a home on the Six Nations Reserve.It happened around 10 this morning on Chiefswood Rd. Police say no one was injured and the man was taken to hospital for a mental health assessment. Several criminal charges are pending.CHCH’s Donna Skelly asked Sgt Dave Smoke of Six Nations Police about a tweet that somebody had been taken hostage. “To my knowledge there was no indication of a hostage being held or any hostage situation. It was local residents and the officers knew the people involved, people knew the officers involved.”“Officers were able to speak to residents and come to a peaceful conclusion under the circumstances.”A stretch of Chiefswood Rd was closed, but has since re-opened. Police say they found a weapon in the home. read more

“Today, the world is in a state of turmoil economically, socially and politically,” said Prime Minister Mahathir, who, in May defeated the political party that had been ruling Malaysia since its independence – over 60 years ago.Moreover, countries are reeling under the pain inflicted by a trade war between the most powerful economies; there is international political turmoil; savage conflicts and widespread terrorism are killing millions; and budgets that should be devoted to helping the poor are being used to buy and maintain expensive weapons of war, he said.“There is something wrong with our way of thinking, with our value system … we still believe that conflict between nations can be resolved with war,” added the Malaysian Prime Minister.He went on to say that “free trade” means “no protection” for small countries and their small industries, with simple products of the poor subjected to clever barriers that prevent their sale to rich markets. At the same time, globalization, despite its benefits, has imperilled the independence of smaller countries.Applauding the efforts of the UN to end poverty, protect the environment and bring peace to all countries, Prime Minister Mahathir, underscored the need for reform in the Organization, particularly the Security Council.“Five countries on the basis of their 70-year-old war victories cannot claim to have a right to hold the world to ransom forever,” he said, underling the need to reform the veto rights in the Security Council.In addition, he declared that a world without the UN would be a disaster and called for the Organization to receive sufficient funding.“No one should threaten it with financial deprivation.”Concluding his address, Mr. Mahathir said that after 15 years, and at the age of 93, he returned to the General Assembly “with the heavy task of bringing the voice and hope of the new Malaysia to the world stage.”“We look toward the UN to hear our pleas.”Full statement available here. read more

Students at Brock benefit from the commitment and expertise of faculty at the University who provide an innovative and student-centred research and learning environment. Their influence engages students to think creatively and critically both inside and outside the classroom.Brock will honour two faculty members for their outstanding contributions to research and teaching at Fall Convocation on Saturday, Oct. 13.Diane Dupont, a professor in the Department of Economics, will receive the Brock University Award for Distinguished Research and Creative Activity. This award recognizes faculty members who demonstrate outstanding research achievements, contributions toward the training of future researchers, and consistency in scholarly or creative performance.Tim O’Connell, a professor in the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, will receive the Brock University Award for Distinguished Teaching. The award recognizes a faculty member who has made a significant commitment to providing and developing quality learning experiences for students, in addition to making valuable contributions in curriculum development and the mentoring of colleagues.O’Connell will receive his award at Saturday’s 10 a.m. ceremony. Dupont will receive her award at the 2 p.m. ceremony and deliver the afternoon’s Convocation address.More than 800 students are expected to receive their degrees at Fall Convocation. All ceremonies will be held in the Ian D. Beddis Gymnasium and a reception for graduates, family members and other special guests will be held after each ceremony.Brock University Award for Distinguished Research and Creative Activity: Professor Diane Dupont, Department of Economics, Faculty of Social SciencesDiane DupontProfessor Diane Dupont is a resource and environmental economist. She achieves excellence in her work by adopting cutting edge methods in her research that looks at fisheries and other resources, and human health issues as they relate to water. Water issues are a growing concern in Canada and Dupont is one of our country’s leading experts when it comes to the economics of water use.Throughout her career, Dupont has produced a strong and influential body of research. In the last three years, Dupont has published nine articles in peer-reviewed journals of the highest quality. These include two in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and one each in the Review of Economics and Statistics, Land Economics, and Ecological Economics.In the last six years, Dupont has made more than 30 presentations of her research to national and international academic associations including the 4th World Congress of Environmental and Resource Economists, the American Agricultural Economics Association, the Canadian Resource and Environmental Economists, the Canadian Economics Association, and the United Kingdom’s Agricultural Economics Society.Dupont’s research has also been awarded funding regularly from national competitions. She has received funding from Canada’s major funding agencies, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and the Canadian Water Network, which was created by the Networks of Centres of Excellence program supported in part by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) funding.She has been awarded more than $1-million of research funding in the last 12 years and in that same time period has also been successful in securing continuous funding over the lifetime of the Canadian Water Network.This year, she was a co-applicant on a $2.3-million SSHRC Partnership Grant to form the Water Economics, Policy and Governance Network. The network is made up of 21 internationally recognized researchers and 35 partner organizations. This includes government agencies – from municipalities, to provincial ministries and federal departments – First Nations communities, and industry groups like the Canadian Water Resources Association and Canadian Water and Wastewater Association.Dupont has displayed a genuine curiosity for scientific inquiry by seeking out new areas of research and methods of analysis. Her work has pushed the boundaries of her own discipline and moved beyond disciplinary constraints to embrace multiple perspectives. At Brock, she has demonstrated an ability to foster spaces for transdisciplinary research, including the development of the University’s Environmental Sustainability Research Centre.Throughout her career Dupont has made a point of mentoring young scholars and has worked hard to be a role model for young women in academia. She has made a significant impact in training of undergraduate and graduate students both at Brock and at other institutions through the widely used graduate-level textbook The Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources that she co-authored in 2004.Brock University Award for Distinguished Teaching: Professor Tim O’Connell, Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, Faculty of Applied Health SciencesTim O’ConnellExperiential education is defined as “a philosophy and methodology in which educators purposefully engage with learners in direct experience and focused reflection in order to increase knowledge, develop skills and clarify values.”Professor Tim O’Connell’s teaching philosophy resonates with and applies this definition when he invites his students to “walk across the curriculum,” for they engage with academic content in an experiential framework. As O’Connell formulates it, “I follow the old adage of ‘See one, do one, teach one,’ and provide practical experiences and combine them with theory and reflection.”O’Connell’s teaching evaluations are among the highest quantitative scores in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences. The qualitative comments provided by his students clearly indicate that his students – both current and former – recognize and value both his expertise in the discipline and his skill as a teacher.He is known as a co-founder of BaseCamp, an outdoor experiential orientation program. Prior to the start of term, incoming students take part in a variety of outdoor trips that are led by current Brock students. Through this experience the new students build community through the peer mentorship of current students, gain experience as outdoor leaders, and acquire information on healthy choices, understanding diversity and living away from home.A colleague observes that O’Connell is also known for his research in reflective journaling and how he applies that research to his teaching: “While these areas of inquiry have certainly impacted the research and pedagogical literature around the world, I have been most impressed with how Tim applies the themes present in his research in his teaching practice. Tim’s courses often include the journaling components he writes about, and I have personally used Tim’s articles on journaling in my own courses with great success to inspire guided reflection during field and classroom experiences.”In 2011, O’Connell was named the recipient of the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences Award for Teaching Excellence. In April 2012, he was announced as a recipient of a prestigious Chancellor’s Chair in Teaching Excellence, which provides funding for research in the scholarship of teaching and learning over three years. He has been involved with the workshop program of the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation. After he won the Faculty award for teaching excellence in 2011, he took part in the Instructional Skills Workshop, a three-day intensive teaching skills development course, modeling continued professional development as a life-long learner.A graduate student observed that O’Connell has been described as “the leader who is not known” because he carries himself with such pedagogic humility, an indication of selfless teaching. Another former student, now employed outside of Brock, writes: “As an educator, he does not assume to be the holder of knowledge, but rather supports students in answering their own questions. Above all, Dr. O’Connell nurtures curiosity and helps to create a supportive and encouraging environment in which to learn.” read more

first_imgMiss Baldwin is considered to pose a risk of harm to the childrenNottingham Family Court Louis Madge, who is also missingCredit:Nottinghamshire Police It came after he said officers were growing “increasingly concerned” for the children’s welfare and safety.On Friday night, he said: “Samantha has no legal custody of the boys at this time. Our investigation team are exploring a number of lines of inquiry.” New images were released of the family on Saturday. One showed a smiling Dylan in a red school uniform. Two others, taken from CCTV cameras, showed the trio walking into a building together days before the disappearance.Supt Rich Fretwell confirmed on Saturday that officers were still working on the notion they remain together and appealed directly to Ms Baldwin to “do the right thing” and return the boys to the “safety of the court”. “We cannot stress enough the likelihood that Samantha may have changed her appearance and we would like you to keep an open mind.”In a statement Nottingham Family Court added: “It is assumed that she has abducted Louis and Dylan. The children have now been made wards of court. Miss Baldwin is considered to pose a risk of harm to the children.” Dylan, in what appears to be a red school uniform  The 42-year-old was last seen near Nottingham city centre that day​ and a missing persons appeal was launched​ on Tuesday​. Police later announced the investigation had become an abduction inquiry.As the search enters its fifth day, police are continuing to appeal for information on the whereabouts of the trio, with officers warning Ms Baldwin may have changed her appearance or name.  Fears are growing for a missing mother and her two sons after a family court warned she posed a “risk of harm” to them.Samantha Baldwin is thought to have disappeared with Dylan Madge, six, and his brother Louise, nine, on Monday following a decision by Nottingham Family Court to remove the two boys from her care. Ms Baldwin was last seen on Monday Credit: Raymonds Press Two women aged 62 and 36 have been arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender and were released on bail. Lines being investigated include whether Mrs Baldwin is being helped by someone, or is lying low at a hotel or bed and breakfast.“There is always the possibility that Samantha could be being harboured by someone,” Supt Fretwell continued. “We would urged that person to come forward and let us know where the boys are. Ms Baldwin and her son Dylan in the days before the disappearance center_img Dylan, in what appears to be a red school uniform  Ms Baldwin and her son Dylan in the days before the disappearance Credit:Nottinghamshire Police Ms Baldwin is described as 5ft 7in and of slim build with shoulder-length, highlighted blonde hair and green-blue eyes. She was last seen wearing a red knee-length coat but may have changed her clothing.Louis has collar-length straight fair hair, a fair complexion and blue eyes, while Dylan has collar-length straight dark brown hair, a tanned complexion and brown eyes.Anyone with information should call Nottinghamshire Police on 101 urgently, quoting incident number 332 of March 27. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Louis Madge, who is also missing Samantha Baldwin, who is being searched for by police Ms Baldwin was last seen on Monday  Samantha Baldwin, who is being searched for by policeCredit: Nottinghamshire Police “We are concerned that Samantha poses a risk to the boys and we have a 100 strong team of officers working around the clock to trace her and return the children safely,” he added. “We would also like to appeal to anyone who owns or runs a guest house, B&B or hotel to check your registers and be mindful that the group may be staying under a different name.”We would also ask caravan park operators and holiday let properties to think about any groups that have joined them since Monday.last_img read more

EHF EURO 2014 Serbia beat Montenegro 32:25 (18:13) in the first official match of two teams after dissolution of former “Serbia and Montenegro” union.Serbia – Montenegro 32-25 (18-13)Serbia: Đukanović (5 odbrana) Pušica, Vujin 9 (3/3), Nikčević 6, Manojlović 1, Toskić 2, Stanić (6 odbrana) Ilić 1, Radivojević, Milić, Prodanović 2, Stojković 4, Nemanja Ilić, Rnić, Mitrović, Zelenović 2, Petar Nenadić 4, Draško Nenadić 1 Marsenić.MontenegroMijatović (4 odbrane) Rakčević 4, Borozan 1, Milašević, Lipovina 1, Marković 2, Rajković (2 odbrane), Radović, Miloš Vujović 1, Simić (5 odbrana), Grbović, Pejović 5, Ševaljević, Perišić 3, Simović 1, Lasica 5, Petričević 1 Sedmerci: 1/1 Isključenja: 12 minuta.RESULTS: 2:2 (3.) 6:5 (8.) 9:5 (12.) 11:6 (17.) 13:11 (24.) 16:11 (27.) 18:15 (32.) 23:16 (37.) 26:17 (42.) 28:17 (45.) 28:19 (47. t.o) 28:21 (48.) 30:22 (50.) 31:23 (54.) 31:25 (57.)In the first match of tournament in Skopje, Macedonia beat Montenegro 33:27. ← Previous Story Provident Cup 2014: First Hungarian win – Polish domination over Jicha and Co. Next Story → SHOCK IN SPAIN: Alex Dujshebaev to miss EHF EURO 2014! read more

first_imgIntel’s Sandy Bridge processors have been official for some time, but all the attention has been on the high-end quad-core models . The dual-core models were supposed to come out later (February 20th to be precise) but the flaws with the Cougar Point chipset pushed that date back a bit. Now Intel has revised the chipset and it sounds like the dual-core Sandy Bridge processors are on the way.Dell, HP, Lenovo, and others all have dual-core systems on the way as well. ZDnet has more details on those releases if you are curious. Basically the systems are coming and if you are looking for a new notebook that’s either portable or not a desktop replacement, hot new gear will be available soon.This doesn’t apply to Apple though. They are very buddy-buddy with Intel these days and got the chips first. So Apple wasn’t just one of the manufacturers to come out with Sandy Bridge laptops, they were also the first to release the dual-core chips, specifically the 2415M and the 2620M in the 13-inch MacBook Pro. The 15- and 17-inch MBPs have Sandy Bridge quad-cores.As for, say, Lenovo, they’ve already announced their quad-core models, like the ThinkPad T420, as well as some dual-cores, like the T420s. The latter will run Intel’s  Core i3-2310M. The ThinkPads won’t be available until late March though.And why does this matter? Isn’t quad-core the way to go anyway? Sometimes it is, but keep in mind that most laptops are still dual-core and these processors are both cheaper and often less power demanding than quad-core models. With Sandy Bridge’s improvements and the new Intel HD graphics these processors should bring a significant improvement to more portable notebooks.Dell has said a new ultra-slim Sandy Bridge notebook will be announced next week, which probably means we’ll see something cool from them, as well as more stuff from other manufacturers.last_img read more

first_imgLiverpool striker Daniel Sturridge insists he has no issues over his playing time and will instead give it his all when called upon by coach Jurgen KloppThe England international has been in stellar form this season with four goals in seven appearances across all competitions, which includes a stunning late equaliser in last weekend’s 1-1 draw at Chelsea.However, Sturridge is yet to make a start in the Premier League this term with Klopp often preferring to use Mohamed Salah, Roberto Firmino and Sadio Mane up front for Liverpool.But Sturridge is just focused on making the most of his opportunities, no matter how small or insignificant they may be.“Whatever decisions the manager makes, he’s the boss,” he told the club website.“Whatever team he picks, you just give your best whether you come on for five minutes or start the game. It’s just about giving everything on the pitch whenever you get the minutes.”The 29-year-old is keen to win silverware at Anfield after near misses for Klopp in the last three years.The German suffered defeat to Real Madrid in last season’s Champions League final, while also losing the Europa League and EFL Cup finals in 2016.“There’s no point in worrying about what we haven’t won or what we need to,” he added.“We’ve got a great squad, a great manager, the backroom staff are top drawer, the fans are great. What more would players want?Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“We want to get over the tipping point where we’re able to win something.”Bittersweet. Tomorrow we go again. Big tings a gwan!! Let’s go!! pic.twitter.com/2Ho2TxgTfv— Daniel Sturridge (@DanielSturridge) September 28, 2018He continued: “That’s the goal for us. Once we lift that first trophy, you’d hope that would have a domino effect and we’d be able to win a few more.“I feel like I’m a winner – I’ve won stuff in the past. But it’s the future now. I want to win something here with Liverpool.“We’ve had opportunities, we’ve been to a couple of finals since I’ve been here and weren’t able to win. To be able to win a trophy is what would take us to the next level.“It’s one of those where you just have a positive attitude about it, don’t put any pressure on winning something or have it in your mind that we have to do this or that.“When we play with a smile on our face and we work hard and put the opposition under a lot of pressure – stamp our style on them – I believe we can beat anybody on our day.“We got to the Europa League final and the League Cup final, last season we did well in the league and the boys got to the Champions League final. This season, we’re just focusing on trying to take the next step.”last_img read more

first_imgPart I of the Leadership At Its Best program, co-sponsored by Syngenta and ASA, was held Aug. 5-8 in Minneapolis. Fifteen soybean producers participated in the program, designed for current state association board members and/or key committee members to support their organizations’ efforts to build for the future by helping to develop and train their leaders.LAIB participants Matt Wright (left) and Rusty Grills during a session of the program. (ASA photo by Kathie Mullen)Participants in the LAIB program learn how to enhance their leadership skills to be strong spokespersons for the soybean industry. They learn how to address legislative issues, interact with the media, manage diverse communications styles, plan and strategize for the future and improve productivity.  This year’s class was assisted by ASA Chairman Steve Wellman, First Vice President Ray Gaesser, Executive Director Bill Schuermann and Project Coordinator Kathie Mullen.Part II will be held in Washington, D.C. in March in conjunction with the ASA Board meeting.  Participants will concentrate on the importance of communicating with members of Congress, parliamentary procedure and key legislative issues affecting U.S. soybean farmers. They will also meet with members of Congress from their respective states.Syngenta Head of Industry Relations Rex Martin speaks during Part I of Leadership At Its Best in Minneapolis. (ASA photo by Kathie Mullen)The 2013-2014 Leadership at Its Best participants are:Josh Kirkpatrick (Ind.), Rolland Schnell (Iowa), Kyle Jeschke (Kan.), Barry Alexander (Ky.), Heather Feuerstein (Mich.), Wayne Stafford (Md.), Mike Skaug (Minn.), Matt Wright (Mo.), Robert Johnston (Neb.), Michael McPherson (N.C.), Craig Olson (N.D.), Mike Heffelfinger (Ohio), John Horter (S.D.), Rusty Grills (Tenn.), Don Lutz (Wis.).last_img read more

first_imgOur readers are quite the shutterbugs.There was a lot of excitement in Clark County during 2012, much of it captured on camera by you and sent to us.Each Wednesday, The Columbian’s Neighbors section highlights the week’s most interesting reader-submitted photos, whether heart-warming or humorous. There was no shortage this year of high-quality images — pictures that captured raw emotion, perfectly summed up an event and proved what’s great about living in this county.We combed through hundreds of such shots and picked 10 of the best — a memorable journey through the year from your perspective.Keep on sending your photos to neighbors@columbian.com in 2013. Who knows? Maybe you’ll see yourself on this same page next year.last_img read more

first_imgNational pet retailer Petco plans to bring its smaller concept, Unleashed by Petco, to Vancouver’s Mill Plain Heights neighborhood, according to public documents issued in January to request construction bids.A July opening is anticipated for the store, a company representative said by email. The store will be in the Safeway-anchored Vancouver Heights shopping complex on the corner of East Mill Plain Boulevard and Andresen Road. It will take up approximately 5,600 square feet of space formerly occupied by a Blockbuster Video store, about half the size of a traditional Petco store, and employ about 10 people,The San Diego-based company already operates three full-sized Petco stores in Clark County: in the Cascade Park area, in Hazel Dell and in the Orchards area.Unleashed stores carry everyday pet essentials, such as food, treats, medicine and accessories. But unlike the larger stores, the smaller Unleashed model does not carry actual pets, such as fish, turtles and birds. Still, according to the Petco website, staff at the smaller stores are trained to give knowledgeable pet information, and the stores also aim to provide a neighborhood gathering place for pet owners by offering classes and community outreach programs.The planned Unleashed store will be Vancouver’s first, although the concept has already debuted in Portland where Petco operates two such stores, one on West Burnside Street and another off Southeast Powell Boulevard.last_img read more

first_img Today: Feds using photo analysis in Boston caseObama honors bombing victims in BostonWednesday: Boston official says video footage shows bomb suspectTuesday: Boston bombs said to be made from pressure cookersMonday: Death toll raised to three in Boston Marathon bombingBOSTON — Plucking a couple of faces in baseball caps out of a swarming crowd, the FBI zeroed in on two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing and shared surveillance-camera images of them with the world Thursday in hopes the public will help hunt them down. The somewhat blurry but still detailed photos and video depict one young man in a dark cap and another in a white cap worn backward, both wearing backpacks and one walking behind the other on the sidewalk near the finish line as marathoners run by.The man in the white hat was seen setting down a backpack at the site of the second explosion, said Richard DesLauriers, FBI agent in charge in Boston. “Somebody out there knows these individuals as friends, neighbors, co-workers or family members of the suspects,” he said. “Though it may be difficult, the nation is counting on those with information to come forward and provide it to us.”They looked much like typical college students, but DesLauriers described them as armed and extremely dangerous, and urged anyone who sees or knows them to tell law enforcement and “do not take any action on your own.” Bombing suspect 2last_img read more

first_imgFelani . File PhotoThe Indian Border Security Force (BSF) killed a total of 403 Bangladeshi nationals along the India-Bangladesh border in past nine years, according to human rights organisation Odhikar.The Bangladesh-based organisation said this on Friday issuing a statement marking the seventh anniversary of the killing of Bangladeshi girl Felani by BSF.In the statement, Odhikar said that the 403 Bangladeshi citizens were killed by the BSF between 2009 and 2017.Among them, some 269 were gunned down, another 109 were tortured to death and 25 were killed by other means. Furthermore, 593 Bangladeshis were injured.Among the injured, 337 were shot, 219 were tortured and 37 were injured in different ways. A further 468 persons were abducted by BSF personnel during this period.On 7 January 2011, BSF members of the Indian Border Security Force (BSF) shot dead Felani Khatun, as she was crossing the India-Bangladesh border into Bangladesh. Her body was left hanging from the barbed wire fence of the border.To date, BSF member Amiya Ghosh, who was involved in the killing and his superior officers, have not been convicted. The adjudication of Felani’s killing was held in BSF’s own court, General Security Forces Court (GSFC), where the accused Amiya Ghosh was not found guilty.Odhikar in its statement said Felani’s killing was a brutal example of the aggression of the Indian government towards Bangladesh over the past decades.The indiscriminate killing and torturing of Bangladeshi nationals, regardless of age, is nothing new to the BSF, the statement added. BSF tortured school student Hasnat Halsham Inu, 15, to death in 2010 while another student Hasanuzzaman, 16, was shot dead in 2015.In 2017, BSF members shot and killed two school students, Sohel Rana and Harun-ur Rashid.Odhikar condemned the killing and torturing of Bangladeshi citizens, including Felani, in the hands of BSF, and all incidents of human rights violations and political and economical aggression of the Indian government.Citing reports, the rights organisation said every year many Bangladeshi citizens are killed and injured either by being shot or tortured by BSF along the Bangladesh-India border.On many occasions, the statement said, BSF members attacked and robbed Bangladeshi people by violating the sovereignty of Bangladesh and illegally trespassing onto Bangladesh territory.According to the statement, the state government of Assam has reportedly taken an initiative to evict Bangla-speaking Indian-Muslim citizens on the pretext of identifying illegal migrants in Assam.It added the India’s ruling Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) formed the local government in Assam through provincial elections in 2016.This newly elected state government of Assam is trying to push the Bangla-speaking Indian-Muslim citizens towards Bangladesh, whose predecessors came to Assam region before 24 March 1971.The statement said the rights organisation believes that an independent and sovereign state can never accept such aggression and human rights violations perpetrated on its citizens and on its soil by another state.It also said the international community needs to raise concerns regarding these issues, otherwise these aggressive activities may destabilise Bangladesh; and such destabilisation might spread through South Asia.last_img read more

first_imgJust about everyone has seen and even used the heart shape that appears on greeting cards, emojis, pillows, paintings, and personal letters. It speaks of love and romance. What we all know is that the symbol looks nothing like a real heart, so how did the symbol become so popular? According to Priceonomics, the emblem is quite ancient — it was depicted in Grecian, Mycenaean, Roman, Cretian, and Corinthian pottery but was not used to represent love.There is no real definitive answer, but many theories have been proposed. Some believe it was fashioned after the outline of either breasts or buttocks while others associate it with the shape of ivy leaves, which have the trait of fidelity assigned to them because of their evergreen nature. They were also representative of Dionysus, the god of wine and fertility.Conventional heart symbol. Photo by Fibonacci CC BY-SA 3.0For the ancient Greeks, around the 4th century AD, an ivy vine was used to designate a brothel in the city of Ephesus. Another theory surrounds the plant Silphium, possibly a relative of fennel, which was brought to the Mediterranean area from the ancient North African city of Cyrene, near today’s Shahhat, Libya.Silphium sap was used in ancient times as a seasoning, perfume, and birth control. The Greeks claimed it was a gift from the god Apollo, and it was so valuable the plant was depicted on the coins from Cyrene.The earliest known visual depiction of a heart symbol – a lover hands his heart to the beloved lady. La Roman de la Poire, mid-13th century.Some depict a seed pod, or fruit, in the characteristic shape of our modern heart symbol. In fact, the plant was used for so many different purposes, it may have been driven to extinction.Roman Emperor Julius Caesar attempted to cultivate the herb but had no luck. According to Pliny the Elder, a Roman lawyer, author, and naturalist in the first century, the last plant was given to the Roman Emperor Nero. It’s impossible, however, to say for sure that the plant is extinct when it has not been correctly identified.Bust of Nero at the Capitoline Museum, Rome. Photo by cjh1452000 CC BY-SA 3.0The ancients were aware of the true shape of the human heart through conducting research on corpses. It is often said that when the Catholic Church came into power, autopsies became unlawful, and any learned references to anatomy were buried by the Church.Related Video: Why do Barber Shops Feature a Red, White and Blue Pole?Martin Clayton, head of prints and drawings at the Royal Collection in Windsor Castle says that is not true. According to Clayton, as reported by The Telegraph, as long as dissections were handled with respect and the body parts were buried in one grave, the Church fully supported that study.Early depiction of the Heart of Jesus in the context of the Five Wounds, in a 15th century manuscriptTime explains that in the Middle Ages, the heart symbol more resembled a pine cone than the valentine shape we recognize today. Furthermore, it wasn’t until the 13th or 14th century that the valentine heart shape was popularly associated with love.It was simply a decoration before that. Also, around 1255, a French love poem, Le Roman De La Poire by Thibaut, was accompanied by a drawing of a lover passing a gift to his beloved.Leaden heart of Christoph Otto von Velen (d. 1733) at the chapel of Raesfeld Castle, Germany. Photo by Daniel Ullrich, Threedots CC BY-SA 3.0According to The Lancet, this is the first depiction of the human heart in literature. The illustration shows the man offering his heart to a woman; it has a conical form and looks more like a scone than a heart, however it is based on the common depiction of the human heart in anatomical texts of the era. Le Roman De La Poire may be the origin of the idea that one can “give” one’s heart.In a 14th century fresco at the Scrovegni Chapel in Padua, Italy, the Florentine artist Giotto di Bondone shows a conical human heart being presented to Jesus Christ. In the late 15th century, playing cards were introduced by the French with the modern heart symbol and spread throughout the world.The Sacred Heart of JesusCatholicIreland.net says that the heart symbol came into being when Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690) saw it in a vision as the Sacred Heart of Jesus, surrounded by thorns. That isn’t a likely theory as the vision occurred centuries after the symbol was first used, and even after it was used on playing cards. Still, the event may have something to do with how that particular shape came into popularity as a representation of love.18th century depiction of the Sacred Heart from the vision of Marguerite Marie Alacoque showing anatomical features (the aorta and the pulmonary artery)In 2000, Dutch neurosurgeon Pierre Vinken authored a book titled The Shape of the Heart which was reviewed by cardiologist, Dr. M.J.M. Cramer in 2001 for the Netherlands Heart Journal. Dr. Cramer says that Aristotle described the shape of the heart in the History of Animals as three cavities with the largest on the right-hand side, a medium sized one in the middle and the smallest on the left.Later illustrators attempted to correct Aristotle’s mistake by placing the two largest chambers on the outside with the smallest in the middle, leading to the modern heart symbol.Saint Ignatius of Loyola and Saint Louis Gonzaga gaze upon the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Painting by José de Páez, c. 1770Art historian, Martin Kemp, author of Christ to Coke: How Image Becomes Icon claims, “Some types of images are specific — like [Mona] Lisa and Che [Guevara]— while some are generic, such as the heart shape.”Read another story from us: The Myths and Legends Surrounding the Real St. Valentine’s Day“The generic ones tend to seep gradually into the general consciousness. The heart shape appeared on playing cards and became the religious symbol of the sacred heart, before becoming the ubiquitous symbol of love.”last_img read more

first_img Advertisement LeBron and Kyrie Irving torched the Warriors for 82 combined points, and stole Game 5 from the Warriors at Oracle Arena last night. Even though the unanimous NBA MVP, Steph Curry, was on the floor for Golden State, it became clear that the team MVP, Draymond Green, was watching the game on TV due to suspension. The Warriors without Green are like the A-Team without Mr. T.Today in The Herd, Colin said Green’s tough guy role, and multi faceted skillset, is the one irreplaceable cog in the Warriors machine.“Last night, with no Draymond, and Bogut gets hurt in the second half, you’ve got Harrison Barnes at the rack. You’ve got no tough guy. The suburb team lost their guy from Saginaw. And they didn’t have anyone to back him up.“The Warriors advanced through portions of this year’s Playoffs while Steph Curry was sidelined with a knee injury. The loss of Curry was significant, but the Warriors have Klay Thompson and a bench loaded with capable scorers to step up in his absence. Without Green, the Warriors don’t have a soul. He’s the agitator, the distributor, the rebounder. Most importantly, he’s the one tough guy on the team that can back up the Warriors arrogance, swagger, and trash talk. On a team full of undersized finesse scorers, Draymond is the bouncer.“Golden State’s got 6’2’’, 180 pound Steph. 6’7’’, 190 pound Livingston. 6’7’’, 205 Klay. And 6’8,’’, 210 pound Harrison Barnes. That’s thin for a lacrosse team, that’s a skinny golf club.”The Warriors have been compared ad nausea to the 1995 Bulls during their record breaking 73-win regular season. Even though it’s largely pointless to compare team’s from different era’s, the most striking similarity between the teams are their enforcers. Green is the irreplaceable tough guy for the Warriors, just like Dennis Rodman was for the Bulls.“They’re very similar teams. And they’re no more similar than one spot. Rodman and Draymond. A little crazy. Can kick, can flail. Never truly appreciated. People don’t understand their basketball IQ. They’re the bouncer at the nightclub. Can do the dirty work.  Can talk trash. Michael and Pippen didn’t have to get into that. Klay and Steph don’t have to get into the trash talk. Draymond can carry all that stuff.  There is so much value in Draymond. Last night.”last_img read more

first_img SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Patient QA Efficiency with Dolphin presented at AAPM 2016 IBA booth. Dolphin Online Ready is released and in clinical use for pre-treatment QA. Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Technology Reports View all 9 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Recent Videos View all 606 items Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 4:25Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -4:25 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Imaging View all 288 items FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items center_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology View all 220 items Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Videos | Quality Assurance (QA) | August 15, 2016 Dolphin QA Efficiency: Transmission Detector Released at AAPM CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.last_img read more

first_imgCosta Rica’s publicly-owned National Power and Light Company (CNFL) is requesting an increase in electricity rates that, if approved, would raise basic rates for its customers by 36 percent. Its customer base includes most of the San José greater metropolitan area.CNFL’s petition was submitted to the Public Services Regulatory Authority (ARESEP), which must approve rate hikes, on Aug. 30. In its petition, the electricity supplier said 26 percent of the revenue from the proposed rate hike would go to cover energy purchases in 2016. Some 8 percent would cover energy purchased from the Costa Rica Electricity Institute (ICE) last year and other operating expenses.ARESEP in recent months has rejected two rate change requests from CNFL on the grounds that the firm was unable to properly justify spending on wages and because it failed to explain recent investments.CNFL says those rejections, plus an increase in tariffs on electricity generation approved in March, “are forcing this agency to request compensation for all of its additional expenses.”The request was submitted for review to ARESEP’s Energy Administration. If approved by that office, the petition will be submitted for discussion at a public hearing to allow CNFL customers the chance to present arguments for and against the proposed rates.ARESEP will evaluate the arguments presented during the hearing as well as the Energy Administration’s report before issuing a final decision. If new rates are approved, they would come into effect in December.The latest electricity rate hike — 2.1 percent — for CNFL’s customers was approved in February. Facebook Comments Related posts:No electricity rate hikes, despite ICE request Regulatory Authority approves lower electricity rates starting October Electricity rates: regulator says drop ’em, utility companies say raise ’em Electricity rates to rise 19 percent in Januarylast_img read more

first_img Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths Sponsored Stories The difference between men and women when it comes to pain Comments   Share   “I think the hardest thing for any political party now is to work out what has really changed since the financial crisis and what hasn’t,” Blair was quoted as saying. “My view is that you still … have to have a strong alliance with business as well as the unions. You have got to be very much in the center ground on things like public sector reform.”(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Associated PressLONDON (AP) – Tony Blair said Wednesday that he would love a chance to return as Britain’s prime minister _ but acknowledged a comeback is extremely unlikely.In an interview to mark the fifth anniversary of his departure from office, the 59-year-old suggested how he believed the Labour Party that he led for 13 years could return to power _ urging his successor not to abandon the political center ground. Check your body, save your life Blair, who became Labour leader in 1994 and British chief in 1997, resigned in June 2007 _ hurried out of power by supporters of his restive Treasury chief Gordon Brown, who had long desired to lead the country but lasted less than three years once he captured the post.Asked if he would welcome a return as prime minister, Blair was quoted by London’s Evening Standard as saying: “Yes, sure, but it’s not likely to happen is it, so…”The Labour Party was ousted from office in May 2010, when no party won an overall majority in a national election _ leading the once rival Conservative Party and Liberal Democrats to form an unlikely coalition.Blair said he believes the next election, scheduled for May 2015, will likely see Prime Minister David Cameron’s Conservatives or the Labour Party win outright.“Frankly you can’t tell what will happen, if there will be a coalition or not, but I suspect it will be far more of a two party fight next time,” Blair said.He urged Ed Miliband _ who replaced Brown as Labour Party leader in late 2010 _ not to turn his back on Britain’s financial sector or the business community in response to the global financial crisis. Top Stories How do cataracts affect your vision?last_img read more

first_img Company News Freedom Mortgage Simplifile technology 2017-01-18 Staff Writer Simplifile, a provider of real estate document collaboration and recording technologies for lenders, settlement agents, and counties, announced that Freedom Mortgage has joined its network of mortgage lenders. Freedom Mortgage will be using the Simplifile Collaboration service in its wholesale division.Mike Graham, VP of National TPO Operations at Freedom Mortgage, is looking forward to working with a more efficient method to go through the closing process. “Freedom’s network of settlement partners plays a significant role in our ability to deliver superior service and on-time closings to our mortgage customers,” he said. ”Through the Simplifile Collaboration service, we are able to work with our settlement partners in real time, which creates a more streamlined closing process and ultimately leads to a better borrowing experience for the customer.”Simplifile Collaboration enables lenders to share, receive, and validate documents and data with settlement partners via a protected platform and provides clarity into settlement partner processes. The system also automatically notes file changes, updates, deficiencies, and statuses to craft an audit-ready compliance trail, according to the press release.Paul Clifford, President of Simplifile, said that Simplifile will spark lenders and providers to hold more conversations regarding the closing process. “The importance of true collaboration between lenders and settlement providers in the post-TRID era cannot be overstated,” he said. “By facilitating direct, real-time interaction, Simplifile Collaboration provides a consistent, secure, auditable means of completing key mortgage loan documents in accordance with TRID.” Freedom Mortgage Joins the Simplifile Network in Headlines, News, Technologycenter_img Share January 18, 2017 755 Views last_img read more