2011Charl Schwartzel+0.90190.0596 In the chart above, you can see that the same general pattern holds for every tier of the money list: Higher-earning players gain more strokes with their long games, while lower-earning ones lose more strokes the same way — and the impact of putting is relatively muted by comparison.This, of course, flies in the face of “drive for show, putt for dough.” Putts do constitute the plurality of shots on tour — they make up around 40 percent of all strokes — so in hindsight, it’s not surprising that the conventional wisdom says putting is the primary separator of wheat from chaff. But with the advent of modern analytics, we can see that the long game is more important on average.A good long game usually wins at AugustaUnfortunately, the Masters itself does not keep tournament-level strokes-gained statistics. But we can look at Masters winners’ stats from other PGA Tour events3Again, excluding tournaments for which ShotLink data was not available. during the same seasons, in search of patterns of play that may translate well at Augusta National.The course is famous for its slick, undulating greens, which might suggest that it rewards putting skill. But going back to 2004 again, only three of the past 13 Masters winners have ranked among the top 10 in putting strokes gained during the year they donned the green jacket — and two of those players (Spieth and Tiger Woods) were equally elite according to strokes gained: tee-to-green. Meanwhile, six of the 13 winners were actually below-average putters according to strokes gained. (Strokes gained measures everything relative to average, so negative totals mean a player was below-average.)On the other hand, eight of the 13 winners ranked among the top 10 in strokes gained: tee-to-green, and all 13 winners were above-average tee-to-green players in the seasons they won. TEE-TO-GREEN ENTIRE SEASONPUTTING ENTIRE SEASON 2006Phil Mickelson+1.6940.2740 2009Angel Cabrera+0.37630.1763 2005Tiger Woods+1.7440.665 2012Bubba Watson+1.813-0.28160 YEARMASTERS CHAMPIONSTROKES GAINED PER ROUNDRANKSTROKES GAINED PER ROUNDRANK Masters winners have better long games than putting strokes Statistics and rankings are for the PGA Tour season in which a player won the Masters (excluding tournaments where ShotLink data was unavailable). Willett did not play enough PGA Tour rounds in 2016 to have an official rank.Source: PGA Tour 2013Adam Scott+1.345-0.03108 2010Phil Mickelson+1.155-0.15133 2015Jordan Spieth+1.5840.579 2007Zach Johnson+0.42600.665 2008Trevor Immelman+0.6731-0.68191 2004Phil Mickelson+1.415-0.09128 Masters rookie Jon Rahm, 22, heads to Augusta this week with history decidedly not on his side: No player making his debut at the tournament has won it since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979. But the Spanish golfer does have a secret weapon of sorts, one that might help him overcome the weight of history. So far this season, he ranks second on the PGA Tour — ahead of the likes of Jason Day and Jordan Spieth — in a statistical category called “strokes gained: tee-to-green” that measures how well a player hits the ball on all shots other than putts. And despite Augusta National’s longtime reputation as a putting test, it’s this ball-striking ability that will likely determine who wins this week — just like it does every other week on tour.How to gain (and lose) strokesBefore we can isolate the quality of a player’s long game, we need a framework for evaluating every single shot he takes. That’s where “strokes gained” comes in: Developed by Mark Broadie, a business professor at Columbia University,1Broadie formalized the concept in a 2010 paper called “Assessing Golfer Performance on the PGA TOUR.” the statistic uses data from ShotLink — a laser-tracking system that records the location of the ball on every shot — to estimate how many strokes a typical player would need to get the ball into the hole from any given spot on the course. In turn, those numbers can be used to evaluate every player on the PGA Tour, by comparing his performance on each incremental shot in a round to the average.Here’s an example: Let’s say a player tees off on a hole where the average is 4.2 strokes to hole out. He hits a great drive down the middle, his ball coming to rest in a spot on the fairway from which the average player would take an additional 2.8 strokes to hole out. In other words, that one shot essentially did the work of 1.4 shots by an average player — his drive “gained” him 0.4 strokes on the field.2Mathematically, a shot’s contribution to strokes gained equals the expected strokes to hole out before hitting the shot minus the expected strokes to hole out after hitting the shot, minus one (for the stroke the player actually took). Add up these marginal gains and losses, and you get a sense of not only who the best players are, but also why they’re so great — where on the course they gain their edge over the field.The PGA Tour breaks “strokes gained” down into four categories: off the tee, approaching the green, around the green and putting. There are also two aggregate categories: total strokes gained, which is the sum of all categories, and strokes gained: tee-to-green, which is the sum of the non-putting categories. Each stroke a player gains is important, but the driving and approach categories — the ones Rahm excels in — are where great players separate themselves the most from their peers.“Drive for show, putt for dough” is a mythThere’s an old golf adage, attributed to four-time major winner Bobby Locke (who was renowned for his putting ability), that you “drive for show and putt for dough.” In other words, even though long shots are flashy and crowd-pleasing, putting is what wins tournaments. But the data makes clear that the top players gain more strokes from their long games than from their short games.To investigate this, I gathered stats from every PGA Tour season (excluding the handful of tournaments where ShotLink data wasn’t tracked) since 2004 — the first season for which “strokes gained” was calculated — and separated players into groups based on their ranking on the tour’s money list for each season. By taking the average strokes gained for each group, I found that players who finish among the top 10 on the money list average about 1.5 strokes gained per round, which break down by category like this:0.4 strokes gained off the tee0.6, approaching the green0.2, around the green0.3, puttingMost great players gain the majority of their strokes with their full-swing shots. By comparison, putts and shots around the green make up a comparatively small amount of their strokes gained in a given round. Here’s the breakdown of where players gain and lose strokes based on how they rank on the money list: 2016Danny Willett+0.83—0.17— 2014Bubba Watson+1.407-0.05109 This doesn’t mean that the winners didn’t putt well during the Masters itself — the eventual champion usually finishes among the top 10 in the field (at worst) in terms of fewest putts — but it does mean that, for the most part, they weren’t consistently great putters.Just like in my earlier analysis of the top earners, players who finished in the top five at the Masters since 2004 gained the most strokes per round during the season as a whole from their approach shots (where they picked up a shade under half of their total strokes gained), followed by their tee shots, putts and chips or pitches around the green.All of this bodes well for Rahm and his fellow long hitters at Augusta. Although golf is a difficult sport to predict, recent Masters results suggest that players with great long games and middling short games are more likely to finish high on the leaderboard than players with great short games and unremarkable long games. In turn, that explains why Rahm belongs right in the conversation with the likes of Rory McIlroy and Dustin Johnson as Masters favorites — especially since they also perform extremely well in strokes gained from tee to green.4Johnson leads the PGA Tour in the category, while McIlroy would be No. 1 if he’d played enough rounds to qualify. (Rahm’s countryman Sergio Garcia, who ranks third in the metric, isn’t a bad dark-horse pick either.)There is more than one way to be successful in a high-variance game like golf, and players such as Brandt Snedeker and Luke Donald have enjoyed success primarily because of stellar short-game skills, not powerful long games (as measured by strokes gained). But on average, the top PGA Tour players tend to gain many more strokes from their drives and approach shots than their chips and putts — even at a place like Augusta National, known for its lightning-fast greens. So the next time you hear somebody talk about driving for show and putting for dough, remember that the longest clubs in the bag are the ones that put the most money into the pros’ pockets. read more

first_img KUSI Newsroom Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Bruce Pechman FacebookTwitter Biggest Christmas gifts of 2017 Updated: 6:50 PM December 29, 2017center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsMany parents were out this holiday season looking for the best Christmas gifts for their children, but which gifts topped the charts this year?KUSI was joined by Bruce Pechman, the Muscleman of Technology, with more. Posted: December 29, 2017 KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

first_imgTo help mark the 15th anniversary of her flagship Susquehanna Life magazine, publisher Erica Shames is launching a second title, Susquehanna Business Life, which is set to debut in April.According to Shames, Susquehanna Business Life is the “Inc. magazine for central Pennsylvania. We need a high quality business publication to tell the fascinating stories of the challenges businesses face and overcome, as well as provide knowledgeable how-to information to guide business owners in running and growing their businesses.”Shames expects to publish two issues of Susquehanna Business Life in 2008 (the second is set for October). The magazine will be direct mailed to 15,000 business executives around central Pennsylvania and will eventually be subscriber-based.last_img read more

first_imgThe BSE Sensex fell for second consecutive days following the presentation of India’s annual budget for the fiscal year.Corporate sector feels the general budget is too modest, as they expected the government to give more concessions.The main 30-share BSE index fell 1.2 percent to close at 17,466.20. The 50-share Nifty index also lost 1.2 percent to end at 5,317.90.Oil stocks led the fall. CNX Energy sub-index dropped 3.3 percent, ONGC dropped 4.7 percent, Oil India dropped 4.5 percent and Reliance Industries fell 3 percent. The Indian energy conglomerate was also affected.However, ITC Ltd gained 7.9 percent, touching a record high of 225 rupees, caused by the move of the government to raise excise duty on cigarettes. Its shares ended up 3.5 percent.last_img read more

first_imgAdani Ports and Special Economic Zone (Adani Ports) shares gained as much as 11 percent on Tuesday to hit a 52-week high on the Bombay Stock Exchange (BSE) in response to its upbeat September quarter (Q2) results. Consolidated net profit of the company rose 61 percent year-over-year to Rs 1,091 crore and revenues increased 21 percent to Rs 2,183 crore.The share price closed with a gain of 9.43 percent at Rs 312.60, slightly lower than the 52-week high of Rs 317. It was also the biggest Sensex gainer on Tuesday as well.The company had reported a net profit of Rs 678 crore on total revenues of Rs 1,808 crore in the corresponding quarter last fiscal.In Q2, container volumes increased 30 percent on a year-over-year basis, while consolidated cargo volumes rose 17 percent.”Healthy growth in cargo volumes, operational efficiencies and our efforts to change the mix of bulk cargo beyond coal has enabled us to report all-round growth in our financial numbers. With Make in India scheme of Govt of India likely to take off in the near future, our SEZ monetization is expected to gain momentum,” Adani Ports CEO Karan Adani said in a regulatory filing to the BSE.”Implementation of GST will help our Logistic arm to expand further. With our port to Hinterland connectivity further improving we would be truly a fully integrated player providing end to end service to our customers. This will result in higher volume and financial growth,” he added.Adani Enterprises, on the other hand, reported a 62.7 percent drop in net profit to Rs 80.69 crore in Q2 from Rs 216.79 crore in the year-ago period; revenues also fell to Rs 1,797.73 crore from Rs 1,979.94 crore, YoY.The share price closed at Rs 67.60, down 5.26 percent from its previous close.The BSE Sensex edged 87 points lower to end at 28,091 on a day when most Tata Group shares lost, reacting to the management rejig at Tata Sons that saw Cyrus Mistry being removed as chairman of the holding company. Ratan Tata succeeded him as the interim head.last_img read more

first_imgBNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir addresses a public rally protesting at the incarceration of party chairperson Khaleda Zia in front of the National Press Club on Monday last. Prothom Alo file photoBangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir on Friday alleged that the Awami League government is creating smokescreen over the issuance of Khaleda verdict copy.BNP chairperson and former prime minister landed in jail on 8 February after a makeshift court had sentenced her to five years’ imprisonment.Since then, Khaleda’s lawyers have been waiting for the certified copy of the verdict to file an appeal against the verdict.“The government is intentionally creating a smokescreen over [the issuance of] of the verdict copy. She is being denie the copy unlawfully. It’s a total breach of law,” Mirza Fakhrul told newsmen after a meeting of the party’s Standing Committee with a group of pro-BNP lawyers at the BNP chairperson’s Gulshan office in the capital.“As per rules, the certified copy of a verdict should be issued five days inside the pronouncement of the verdict, but she [Khaleda] is not yet given the copy although eight days have elapsed [since the verdict],” said the BNP leader.He went on to say, “It shows that the government in a planned manner takes law in its own hands and is resorting to unlawful acts in order to delay the release of the leader [Khaleda].”The BNP leader also alleged that these efforts of the government are aimed at keeping Khaleda away from politics and general elections. “But, the people will give a befitting reply to this through a street agitation.”In response to a journalist’s query, Bangladesh Supreme Court Bar Association president Zainul Abedin, who was standing next to Mirza Fakhrul, said as per the criminal rules, the certified copy of a verdict shall be issued five days inside the pronouncement of the verdict.He said the court is telling them that it is examining the verdict. “There is nothing to examine [in the verdict]. Once the verdict is pronounced, there is no scope to change or examine the verdict or even to change the language of the verdict.”last_img read more

first_img Citation: Researchers design plasmonic cavity-free nanolaser (2014, September 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-09-plasmonic-cavity-free-nanolaser.html (Phys.org) —A team of researchers at Imperial College in London has designed a new type of laser, one that could be made much smaller than today’s models because it would be cavity-free. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the team describes their idea and offer possible uses for such a laser should they be able to build one. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2014 Tech Xplore Journal information: Nature Communications As most that have dabbled in the sciences are well aware, conventional lasers work by bouncing light between mirrors inside of a chamber, also known as a cavity, causing a buildup of photons of a certain type that are eventually released as a beam. While this method has worked extraordinarily well for a host of applications, there is still one area where it is lacking—applications at the nanoscale. This is because, the researchers note, the need for the cavity. In this new effort, the researchers have created a design for a very tiny laser that works without a cavity and is able to do so by taking advantage of prior research into stopping light.The envisioned laser (the team hasn’t actually built one yet) would be made by pressing two metals together, with an insulating material between them, resulting in a sandwich of sorts. Pulses of light sent through the middle part of the sandwich would reverse direction upon encountering the metal part, causing the light to become trapped in a vortex, which means it would be stopped. The researchers have found that in testing their idea, light sent into the laser would get trapped in the vortex for approximately 10 trillionths of a second before breaking free in the form of a beam of light. In addition to being cavity-free, the laser would also be able to emit laser beams with a range of frequencies.With the design created and tested, the team is now moving towards building a prototype of the new type of laser—they believe it could be used in optics applications, perhaps as part of a computer. Others have suggested that if such a laser could be built, it could be used in such diverse applications as signaling, or even prosthetics, because it could be embedded in synthetic tissue.center_img More information: Cavity-free plasmonic nanolasing enabled by dispersionless stopped light , Nature Communications 5, Article number: 4972 DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5972AbstractWhen light is brought to a standstill, its interaction with gain media increases dramatically due to a singularity in the density of optical states. Concurrently, stopped light engenders an inherent and cavity-free feedback mechanism, similar in effect to the feedback that has been demonstrated and exploited in large-scale disordered media and random lasers. Here we study the spatial, temporal and spectral signatures of lasing in planar gain-enhanced nanoplasmonic structures at near-infrared frequencies and show that the stopped-light feedback mechanism allows for nanolasing without a cavity. We reveal that in the absence of cavity-induced feedback, the subwavelength lasing mode forms dynamically as a phase-locked superposition of quasi dispersion-free waveguide modes. This mechanism proves remarkably robust against interface roughness and offers a new route towards nanolasing, the experimental realization of ultra-thin surface emitting lasers, and cavity-free active quantum plasmonics. Explore further An off-center waveguide enables light to be efficiently extracted from nanoscale lasers (a) The core layer of the metal-dielectric (SL) multilayer structure is filled with gain material (blue). (b) Spatially selective excitation of the homogeneous gain layer using a near-field tip leads to the formation of a subwavelength spot of inverted gain, in which the stimulated emission processes take place (inset). Photons are trapped locally in a closed-loop energy vortex (red curved arrows), enabled by an SL point, SL1, at (ω1, k1) that aligns with the peak gain. (c) A second SL point, SL2, at (ω2, k2) enforces a monotonous behaviour of the dispersion over a range of wavevectors with an average slope of (ω2−ω1)/(k2−k1). Bringing the frequencies of the SL points close together while maintaining a large distance in k-space flattens the dispersion to within the bandwidth of the gain (blue), allowing for the formation of highly localized, SL wave packets during lasing operation. Credit: Nature Communications 5, Article number: 4972 doi:10.1038/ncomms5972last_img read more

first_imgEating late at night could cause several health problems including weight gain and increase in insulin and cholesterol levels, show the initial results of an ongoing study. The findings suggest that eating the last meal of the day before 7 p.m. could help you stay in better health.”We know from our sleep loss studies that when you’re sleep deprived, it negatively affects weight and metabolism in part due to late night eating, but now these early findings, which control for sleep, give a more comprehensive picture of the benefits of eating earlier in the day,” said lead author of the ongoing study Namni Goel, Research Associate Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in the US. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”Eating later can promote a negative profile of weight, energy, and hormone markers – such as higher glucose and insulin, which are implicated in diabetes, and cholesterol and triglycerides, which are linked with cardiovascular problems and other health conditions,” Goel said.The new findings, scheduled to be presented at SLEEP 2017, the 31st annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS) in Boston, offer experimental evidence on the metabolic consequences of consistent delayed eating compared to daytime eating. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIn the study, nine healthy weight adults underwent two conditions, one of daytime eating (three meals and two snacks between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m.) for eight weeks and another of delayed eating (three meals and two snacks eating from noon to 11 p.m.) for eight weeks. There was a two-week washout period between conditions to make sure there was no carry over effect. The sleep period was held constant, between 11 p.m. to 9 a.m. The team found that when participants ate later, compared to the daytime condition, weight increased.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Two persons from Asansol and Burdwan were allegedly duped by two e-commerce websites, which sent them a stone and a torn shoe instead of the ordered products.According to sources, on June 28 a person identified as Pijush Kanti Mondal had ordered a pair of expensive sports shoes on an e-commerce website. On Saturday, a youth who was the delivery boy of that e-commerce site, reached Mondal’s home and delivered the product. Before paying the amount, Mondal opened the parcel and found a torn shoe and an empty bottle of soft drink. Immediately, he demanded an explanation and refused to pay the price. The delivery boy informed his superior about the incident. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataLater, the delivery boy claimed that he had been instructed to click a picture of the packaged objects and take them back. But that did not convince Mondal. He thought that it was the work of the delivery person and thus detained him. After a while, the delivery boy was able to convince him that he and the courier partner to the e-commerce site had nothing to do with the debacle. On the other hand, a few days ago a person identified as Amlan Guha, a resident of Burdwan, was also allegedly duped by another e-commerce website. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateDuring the month of June, Guha had ordered two expensive smartphones on the e-commerce site. On July 3, he received the order and had already paid for it. However, when he opened the parcel, he found one smartphone. In the second packet, there was a piece of stone. Immediately, he informed the matter to the e-commerce site authorities but found no positive response. Guha later lodged a complaint at Burdwan police station in this regard.last_img read more

first_img Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Free Q: Do I really need to change my passwords every three months?A: Yep. Let’s face it, when it comes to online security, the weakest link is our collective refusal to create, memorize and change our passwords every 90 days, as the National Security Agency’s Systems and Network Analysis Center suggests.The only solution is to use a different password for every single site you visit, according to Tara Kelly, who co-founded Passpack, a web-based password-management provider that was later sold to Utah-based Kemesa Holdings. With the surplus of sites we enter on a daily basis, the only way to remember all that information is to not have to remember it at all.”That’s what password managers are for,” Kelly explains.We asked her to elaborate on password best practices.Is there an alternative to memorizing complex new passwords every 90 days?Consider using a password phrase. Instead of, for instance, “gaga72013,” use a whole sentence, along with spaces and punctuation. Something like “Lady Gaga rocks my world!” is strong, and it’ll bring a smirk to your face every time you type it in.But what if a site doesn’t support password phrases?This is where a password manager can be put to good use. Many password managers are free, and they not only store your passwords, they also generate complex monsters like “4C!rhxn-KAnw&w5” for you. You only need to enter your master key password once to open the password manager, and it takes care of entering the rest of your passwords.Some people talk about creating their own informal password algorithms. Is this something you recommend?While it’s better than reusing the same password across sites, it’s not as safe as a completely random password or a well-constructed pass phrase. One example of a password algorithm that people frequently use is (name of site) + (birth year) + (cat name). In this case the birth year and cat name never change; the only thing that makes the password unique is the name of the site, which is different for every site you log into. Problem is, password algorithms can be easily reverse-engineered, especially if a hacker targets you specifically. Once the attacker discovers your system, it doesn’t matter that each password is unique. They can easily figure them all out. July 30, 2014 2 min read This story appears in the August 2014 issue of . Subscribe »last_img read more