first_imgThey’re a friendly bunch at Irwins Expert Electrical Buncrana, and they were all smiles today as they welcomed the Donegal Daily cameras for an introduction to their store.Manager John Gill and the sales team, Peter Sweeney and Tony O’Loughlin, talked to us about what makes their store special: Irwins Expert Electrical has been at the heart of the community in Buncrana for over four decades, located on Maginn Road just a few steps from Buncrana Main Street. Over the years, the store has built up a loyal customer base and has developed into the leading supplier of electrical goods in the North West.The newly renovated electrical appliance showroom was voted No. 1 Store of The Year out of 67 Expert stores throughout Ireland in 2018 and the team take great pride in their customer service.Tony, John and Peter at Irwins Expert Electrical BuncranaIrwins Expert Electrical Buncrana services the entire Inishowen peninsula, they deliver, install, and take away old products for free recycling. Plus, with Click & Collect, you can shop online from the comfort of your home and have your items ready for collection prior to visiting the store.The shop stocks the biggest brands and won’t be beaten on price, due to their membership of the Expert Group, which are the largest electrical group in Ireland. So, if you’re looking for a new appliance, technology or simply want to have a browse, you’ll be very welcome to call into Irwins Expert Electrical Buncrana.Check out the Facebook page @irwinexpert for special offers and updates, visit www.expert.ie or telephone the store on: 074 9361161Watch: Meet the team at Irwins Expert Electrical Buncrana was last modified: September 27th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:buncranaBusinesselectricalsInishowenirwins expert electrical#retailShowroomvideolast_img read more

first_img1.  Prud’homme et al, “Body plan innovation in treehoppers through the evolution of an extra wing-like appendage,” Nature Volume: 473 (05 May 2011), pp. 83�86, doi:10.1038/nature09977.By making evolution mean anything, they make it mean everything – and therefore nothing.  By creating an illusion of progress, evolutionists have created the perfect conspiracy: a way to snow the public under the banner of science, using the Stuff Happens Law (SHL).  Philosophers may realize that “stuff happens” amounts to a failure of scientific explanation, but by calling it something more sophisticated – evolution – evolutionists can tinker with it in countless ways.  Being inherently flexible, the Stuff Happens Law lends itself to endless corollaries that can be couched in Darwinian jargon.Strange stuff happens (evolutionary reversal)Stuff happens at any speed (evolutionary stasis or radiation)Stuff happens by surprise (evolutionary innovation)Stuff re-happens (circular evolution)Stuff survives happenstance (living fossils)Stuff makes other stuff happen (humans affecting biology by “unnatural selection”)As long as creative minds inhabit evolutionary biology labs, the future looks bright for endless twists on Darwin’s tale.  Whether this amounts to science is an entirely different question. (Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Evolution is a strange theory; it goes forwards, backwards, sideways and nowhere, fast or slow, up or down, inside out and outside in.  Here are some examples that contradict the slow, gradual picture of progress that was so popular in Victorian England.Re-using lost genes:  Scientists at Massachusetts Institute of Technology are claiming that evolution dug into an old bag of tricks and pulled out something lost 200 years ago.  “Ever since Charles Darwin proposed his theory of evolution in 1859, scientists have wondered whether evolutionary adaptations can be reversed,” the press release from MIT News said.  Examples have been the re-evolution of wings in insects (see 05/28/2003).    Using a computational model, Jeff Gore at the university decided that evolution can reverse itself, but only if fewer than four mutations were involved.  He studied bacteria that achieved resistance to an antibiotic named cefotaxime.  It took five mutations to confer resistance; there were 120 ways to get all five, but only 18 could actually occur, he found.    The article did not get back to the question of how insects could re-evolve wings – a reversal that would seem to involve many more than four mutations.  It also repeated the discredited idea that the human appendix is no longer needed.Going nowhere:  New Scientist announced in a bold headline, “Horsetail fossil tells tale of plant evolution.”  But when the reader looks for said evolution, there is none to be found except a tale indeed.  Alan Channing [Cardiff U] found a fossilized horsetail that must have been preserved in a hot spring environment.  It looks modern: “Though a new species, the fossilised plant is quite similar to some horsetails living today with a single upright evergreen shaft,” the article confessed.  While admitted that horsetails have had a “contested evolutionary history” that Channing’s work now “clears up,” the article went on to say that “The findings suggest horsetails experienced only modest innovations in their long evolutionary history.”    Innovations?  The article presented no evidence of ancestors of horsetails.  Worse, Channing’s study pushes the origin of modern-looking horsetails back another 14 million years, to 150 million years before the present.  The fossil preserved “not only stems but also leaf sheaths, roots and reproductive structures.”  It’s as if this plant popped into existence 150 million years ago and never dreamt up any new innovations all the way to the present except, if anything, the older ones were bigger and better: “Today’s horsetail plants are living fossils, the only surviving members of the class Equisetopsida, the article ended.  “For more than a 100 million years, Equisetopsida plants dominated the understory of the late Mesozoic period forests, stretching up to 30 metres high.”Evolution in reverse:  PhysOrg tells us that cicada-like insects called treehoppers cast aside their front wings 200 million years ago, only to call them up into service as headgear.  “That’s probably shocking news if you are an entomologist, and challenges some very basic ideas about what makes an insect an insect, the researchers said.”    Strange things happen in evolution.  “But then, some 50 million years ago, something strange happened to the cicada-like treehoppers: they once again sprouted wing-like structures from the top of the first segment of the thorax.”  But they didn’t flap: “Some of these wildly divergent extrusions resemble thorns, others look like antlers, and still others like aggressive ants or animal droppings, creating one of Nature’s most exotic menageries.”  It wasn’t clear if the capitalized Nature referred to the outdoors or the journal Nature, where the study made the cover story.1     What does this mean for evolutionary theory?  “Evolution is usually described as linear, but these modified wings suggested the process had come full circle.”  Turning evolution into a personified inventor, French biologist Benjamin Prud’homme said, “This extra pair of wings was not needed for flight, but nor did it prevent it.  So it became raw material for evolution to play with.”  A co-author said that the study shows “how development abilities can be lost or silenced over millions of years, only to be redeployed to contribute to the evolution of a complex and beautiful appendage.”  The abstract of the Nature paper remarked, “This innovation in the insect body plan is an unprecedented situation in 250 Myr of insect evolution.”  The paper claimed this required no new genetic information: “We submit that morphological innovations can arise from the deployment of existing but silenced developmental potentials, therefore requiring not so much the evolution of new genetic material but instead the expression of these potentials.”Evolution in hiding:  Biologists who study fungi have found an embarrassing surprise: according to PhysOrg, “a hitherto unknown type of fungi which has fundamentally expanded the scientific understanding of this group of organisms.”  A British team has uncovered a whole new group of fungi which they named cryptomycota – hidden fungi.Dr Tom Richards, from the University of Exeter’s Biosciences department and the Natural History Museum London, said: “This study has been very surprising – not least because the original sample came from the nearby pond.  Fungi have been well studied for 150 years and it was thought we had a good understanding of the major evolutionary groups, but these findings have changed that radically.    “Current understanding of fungal diversity turns out to be only half the story – we’ve discovered this diverse and deep evolutionary branch in fungi that has remained hidden all this time.”Cryptomycota apparently lack a rigid cell wall.  What does this mean?  The article referred to the fungus as either an “intermediate state” or a “living fossil,” but admitted that it must be successful: “Despite lacking the tough cell wall, they seem still to be very successful in the environment because of their extensive diversity and cosmopolitan distribution.”  The discovery also points out that biologists may be oblivious to large segments of the living world: “Until recent years, researchers investigating microbial diversity have sampled by growing microbes in lab cultures, but now it seems that the vast majority of life forms are never captured using these methods – meaning most of the evolutionary complexity of life remains unsampled.”Evolution by loss:  A lizard in Cambodia has no legs or eyes.  The BBC News has a picture of what looks like an earthworm, but is a “legless lizard” that has also lost its eyes.  Uncommon Descent teased about “Evolution as loss of function.”Unnatural selection:  What would you call “unnatural selection”?  Would it be synonymous with intelligent design?  Not according to Michael Le Page at New Scientist, who has been writing a series about how humans are harming the environment with their pesticides, hunting, climate change, pollution, diseases, and shuffling of invasive species.  He left begging the question of whether humans were naturally selected to do this.last_img read more

first_imgI’m in Portland, Maine, for the North American Passive House Network conference. Yesterday morning I walked a few blocks from my hotel to the conference site, through downtown Portland.The old commercial district here has lots of handsome old three-story and four-story brick buildings. I love to look at the details on these older buildings. At first glance, it may appear that architectural ornament has been randomly applied to these façades; but if one pays attention, it soon becomes clear that most of these façade elements have a function.Older brick buildings with parapets always include an overhang detail to keep rain off the façade. Although these overhangs may be only 12 to 16 inches wide, they effectively move the drip line of the edge flashing away from the plane of the bricks.Many of these buildings include masonry details at every floor — details which interrupt the plane of the brickwork to kick water outward.In most of these older buildings, the windows are “innies,” so that the wood sash are protected from rain.These details may seem minor, but they all serve to protect the bricks from freeze/thaw damage and to limit window rot.The arched stonework at the window heads protects the windows, while the stone sills kick rain out from the plane of the façade.But something strange happened in 1950. In that year, every architect in the country forgot all of the water management lessons that architects had learned in the previous 500 years. Look at the pathetic window “detailing” for this modern brick building.Water is dribbling off the corner of the sill and staining the bricks below.When a brick façade is unprotected by a roof overhang, rain is guaranteed to soak the bricks, with predictable (and unsightly) results.Of all… Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details. Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Memberslast_img read more

first_imgA proposed federal law, HR 5571, would reverse the 30% tariff on imported solar panels ordered by President Donald Trump in January. The bill was introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives on April 19 by Representative Jacky Rosen, a Democrat from Nevada, and four co-sponsors.The tariffs were imposed on the recommendation of the International Trade Commission to fend off the flood of cheap solar imports from China and several other countries. Duties are 30% in the first year and will drop incrementally to 15% in the fourth year, according to a fact sheet from the U.S. Trade Representative.The U.S. solar industry did its best to head off the tariffs, claiming they would result in thousands of lost jobs. Rosen’s announcement took a similar line.“Solar energy’s success throughout Nevada has led to new jobs, cheaper power bills, and the growth of a new industry that is diversifying our state’s economy,” Rosen said in a prepared statement. “This Administration directly threatened the stability and financial well-being of our local solar industry when the President decided to impose a 30 percent tariff on imported panels. An attack on solar energy is an attack on the countless hardworking Nevadans who benefit from this growing industry, and my new bill will reverse this damaging decision.”Co-sponsors include Representative Mark Sanford (R-South Carolina), Representative Jared Huffman (D-California), Representative Ralph Norman (R-South Carolina), and Representative Steve Knight (R-California). The bill has been referred to the House Ways and Means Committee. RELATED ARTICLES If the bill is eventually passed, duties would drop back to the rates in effect before Trump’s order, and companies that import solar products subject to the higher duties would get refunds.EnergySage Solar Marketplace, an online service that gathers quotes for homeowners from installers, reported that the tariffs would increase the cost of a 6 kW system by between $600 and $720 in the first year, or between 10 cents and 12 cents per watt. But the impact will be limited as the cost of solar panels continues to fall.“The end result is that the percentage-based tariff, which is already set to fall each year, will be even smaller because it will be applied to ever-decreasing module costs,” an analysis posted at its website said.The president told a gathering of governors in February that the tariffs would revive the sagging solar manufacturing industry in the U.S., but a report posted at Greentech Media suggested that a PV manufacturing boom in the U.S. was unlikely.center_img President Trump Imposes Tariffs on Solar Panels How the Suniva Trade Dispute is Reshaping the Solar IndustryHearings Open on Solar Panel Trade CaseCould a Trade Dispute With China End the U.S. Solar Boom?last_img read more

first_imgGovernor Bhagat Singh Koshyari is at the receiving end of the ire of political parties, which have demanded an increase in financial relief to nearly one crore rain-affected farmers in Maharashtra. On a day the Supreme Court criticised the State government for not implementing the previously announced assistance for the rain-hit Sangli and Kolhapur regions, the Shiv Sena, Congress and Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) on Monday demanded that the norms set by the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) be expanded to give more help to farmers. By the end of the day, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) had joined the chorus for a hike in compensation, along with the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), which demanded the relief amount be matched to the ₹50,000 given by the Delhi government. Sources in the Governor’s office said the package announced last week is already beyond what is recommended by the NDRF norms. The Governor on Saturday announced ₹8,000 per hectare up to two hectares for agricultural Kharif crops and ₹18,000 per hectare up to two hectares for horticulture/ perennial crops. This is a hike from the ₹6,800 per hectare suggested for agricultural Kharif crops, and an increase in the upper limit in all categories from ₹16,800 to ₹18,000. “The declared amount is already hiked and there is little margin for more improvement,” an official from the Governor’s office said. The Shiv Sena has demanded that the amount be hiked to ₹25,000 per hectare. The party held a protest outside Parliament on Monday, while an editorial in its mouthpiece, Saamana, criticised the Governor for the “low” amount. The Congress and NCP, too, have demanded compensation of more than ₹20,000. The AAP has gone a step ahead. Preeti Sharma Menon, national executive member of the party, said, “The Governor has announced ₹8,000 and ₹18,000 per hectare for Kharif crops and horticulture crops respectively, which is a pittance when compared to ₹50,000 per hectare, the highest in the country awarded by the AAP government in Delhi. The AAP demands that given the large-scale devastation of the Kharif crops due to unseasonal rain, the government declare ₹50,000 per acre as compensation for farmers immediately.”Senior officials said the assessment of the crop damage took time due to the model code of conduct being in place for the Assembly elections. This after aA Cabinet sub-committee headed by the then chief minister Devendra Fadnavis had approved ₹10,000 crore to provide immediate assistance to farmers. But the decision could not be formalised with the imposition of President’s Rule. According to an official estimate, major damage has been to corn, millet, and cotton crops. Senior officials said the overall relief package is worth near ₹8,000 crore to cover crop damage spread over 89 lakh hectares in Vidarbha, Marathwada, and parts of western Maharashtra.last_img read more