first_imgGoa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar is expected to meet Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi next week in a bid to resolve the mining crisis in the the state. The crisis has led to protests by mining-dependent stakeholders after the Supreme Court of India banned mining in all 88 operational mining leases from March this year. “The Chief Minister will hold a joint meeting of all MLAs from mining areas, shortly to arrive at a consensus after which the matter will be taken up with the Centre and the Prime Minister Narendra Modi,” a statement issued by the Chief Minister’s Office said on Friday, after Mr. Parrikar met legislators from the coastal state’s mining belt. Resolving the mining imbroglio is one of the first challenges before Mr. Parrikar, who returned to Goa on June 14 after more than three months of absence, during which he was undergoing treatment at a U.S. hospital.Among the legislators who met the Chief Minister were Speaker Pramod Sawant, Pravin Zantye, Rajesh Patnekar (BJP), Prasad Gaonkar (Independent) and Deepak Pauskar (Maharashtrawadi Gomantak Party), where the Chief Minister discussed ways and means in which mining can be resumed in Goa. After more deliberations with legislators and a joint meeting with all the legislators, Mr. Parrikar is likely to meet Modi during his visit to the national capital next week. The mining issue has been on the boil in Goa following a Supreme Court order in February this year banning extraction and transportation of iron ore from 88 mining leases from March-end this year. The court has directed the state government to reissue the leases following appropriate process. Mr. Pawaskar, MLA of MGP told presspersons after the meeting with Mr. Parrikar on Thursday evening that the government has three options open, namely, passing an ordinance in Parliament to extend the life of the leases, auctioning the leases, and forming a state-run mining corporation to oversee mining operations. The decision will be taken by the government only after the Chief Minister discusses the issue with Prime Minister, reiterated Mr. Pawaskar.Meanwhile, Goa Pradesh Congress president Girish Chodankar, who called on the representatives of mining dependents, who are sitting on a protest in the city for some time demanding immediate resumption of mining activity in the State after the monsoons. He reiterated his party’s stand at a press conference at the Congress headquarters on Friday that they will support any solution for the mining crisis from the government provided it is within legal framework.last_img read more

first_imgPolice have arrested two persons on the charge of beating a one-and-a-half-year-old child to death in a fight that followed an objection by the infant’s father to a child from the accused family urinating in the open at Bagaspur village in Sagar district of Madhya Pradesh on October 1. The accused have been identified as Ram Singh and his son Umesh.“As a six-year-old boy was urinating on the road, the child’s father objected to it. And in turn, the boy’s father and grandfather attacked attacked him with lathis. The 18-month-old boy he was holding suffered blows and died on the spot,” Amit Sanghi, Sagar Superintendent of Police, told The Hindu.“There is a running feud between the two tribal families,” he said.A case was registered under Section 302 [punishment for murder] of the Indian Penal Code. The injured father is being treated at a local hospital.The case had no similarities to the Shivpuri case where two children were beaten to death for allegedly defecating in public, Mr. Sanghi stated, adding, “There is confusion. There is no case of open defecation here.”last_img read more

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ “It’s our defense that stepped up in this game, and we had a tough time preparing for San Sebastian,” said San Beda head coach Boyet Fernandez.“They have a good coach [in Egay Macaraya] and good players like [Michael] Calisaan.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingSan Beda outrebounded San Sebastian, 45-25, and held the Stags to 37.88 percent shooting from the floor.Although the Red Lions made just 21 field goals in 47 attempts, they made up for it from the stripe going 25-of-33. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Javee Mocon led San Beda with 17 points, 11 rebounds, five assists, and two blocks while Davon Potts added 16 points.Calisaan practically carried the Stags’ offense with 23 points on 9-of-20 shooting.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netSan Beda continued the second-best winning streak in the NCAA season 93 men’s basketball tournament after taking down San Sebastian 76-65 Friday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Red Lions won their 10th straight game and improved to 11-1, half a game behind league leader Lyceum with a 12-0 card, while the Stags dropped to 5-6.ADVERTISEMENT Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul MOST READ Some Olympic leaders impatient with onslaught of scandals Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side View comments Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

first_imgBy Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsIt was late fall in 2005 when Alma Jane Bruyere appeared at the door of her grandson’s house in Fort Frances, Ont., carrying in her left hand a lawyer’s letter stating she had qualified for compensation for the abuse she faced while attending an Indian residential school.She handed the letter to her grandson, Ryan McMahon who is now a well known Indigenous comedian.“She came, as she often did, unannounced and sort of quietly,” said McMahon. “We sat down at the table and put the tea on.”She told McMahon her story.“She told me what happened,” he said.And she cried.Bruyere described the darkness of the experience, the repeated sexual, physical and emotional abuse at St. Margaret’s Indian Residential School in Fort Frances.But it was only part of the story.“The most difficult thing for me is that some of what she said was contradictory to what you would expect,” he said. “She endured these traumas, the most horrific traumas a human being can survive; she experienced those, and yet volunteered at the church and found herself at times talking about the positive things that residential schools brought to her. Things like the square meals every day, the friends and the beading and the sewing she learned inside the schools from the nuns. She talked about the poverty that her family faced on the reserve…and the difficulties found on reserves and the poverty and the struggle.“I can’t wrap my head around what that had to have been like to live with those paradoxical understandings in your life,” said McMahon.Before that autumn visit, McMahon’s grandmother had travelled to Thunder Bay for a hearing through the alternative dispute resolution program which pre-dated the multi-billion dollar Indian Residential School settlement agreement. While the letter informed her she had qualified for compensation, it also told her she would have to retell her experiences to get any money.It was something she wouldn’t do, said McMahon.“She stated she didn’t want to go back and wondered why they would make her go back. She felt insulted and hurt again. She had already proven that she qualified and she had to go back and tell her story,” he said. “Her rejection was a statement that they can’t take it back, there is no way to change what happened and how it happened and she didn’t feel a financial payment was ever going to remove the trauma.”Bruyere died on Jan. 14, 2007. She was 72 and never heard Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s June 11, 2008, apology to residential school survivors. She never got to the chance to testify before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Her story now lives only in her grandson.“I know part of her sharing that with me was so that we can honour that past and walk with that knowledge and never let people forget,” he said.And so, this Tuesday, June 11, 2013, on the anniversary of Harper’s apology which was delivered in the House of Commons, McMahon took to Twitter to tell fragments of his grandmother’s story.“She went to Thunder Bay. She brought a feather with her. I’d never seen carry a feather before then. She told me she was scared,” tweeted McMahon, through his handle @RMComedy. “Those hearings changed her forever. She cried, told me her story. ‘You’re strong enough to use this pain for good.’ I carry her story.”McMahon said Harper’s apology has done little to change the reality facing Indigenous peoples in Canada.“We kind of see it for what it was. It was necessary the country was at a boiling point. We also see what is coming from it, more funding cuts than ever. The situation we are now in its way worse than it was five years ago,” he said. “If you are blindly saying reconciliation is here, let’s all work together and hold hands, well that’s not the reality.”McMahon said the anniversary of the apology shouldn’t be about moving on, but about remembering and ensuring the darkness is never forgotten.“As a father…it is my job to break that cycle and free (my children) of the burden of the past and to teach them,” he said. “On Remembrance Day (Nov. 11)…we say, ‘lest we forget.’ But in Canada, (when discussing residential schools) we are always saying, can’t we just all move on? Can’t we just forget it already, can’t you let it go? But, if we are never supposed to forget those other traumas, why should we forget these ones…It is our responsibility to remind people that it is an ugly past and we have to be willing to put it on the line because of that past.”Bruyere’s story also taught her grandson about the resilience of his culture.“She was a Catholic and a pretty devout Catholic, but when she went to those hearings she brought that eagle feather with her,” he said. “She was a lot more traditional than any of us even knew. She spoke the language and carried the histories of her community in her, but rarely talked about it.”But it was one of her last requests that left a permanent mark.“When she passed, in her will, she requested new moccasins. In our traditional funerals, you put on new moccasins on those that pass so when they are on that journey and are greeted by our ancestors, our ancestors know they are ready to take that journey with then,” said McMahon. “That is not something found in any scripture or part of the Bible…She went back home with our ancestors in the way that she really wanted.”jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more