first_imgSAN JOSE — A couple of home games provided the remedy the Sharks needed to start looking like the team labeled as Stanley Cup favorites in training camp.Following a similar formula to Thursday’s win over the Buffalo Sabres, the Sharks completed a two-game homestand with perfect grades Saturday, beating the New York Islanders 4-1 at SAP Center.After the Sharks wrapped up their five-game road trip with a 2-2-1 record Sunday, head coach Pete DeBoer offered a simple road map for turning the ship …last_img read more

first_imgA BBC News story is claiming that butterflies split into competing teams when differences in their wing patterns emerge.  Based on a paper in Nature,1 this is supposed to be an example of a rarely-observed mechanism for speciation, called reinforcement: in this case, “These wing colours apparently evolved as a sort of ‘team strip’, allowing butterflies to easily identify the species of a potential mate.”  Why is this newsworthy?  Julianna Kettlewell explains, “Given our planet’s rich biodiversity, ‘speciation’ clearly happens regularly, but scientists cannot quite pinpoint the driving forces behind it” (emphasis added in all quotes).    The authors of the paper are careful to describe their hypothesis of reinforcement as merely a suggestion: “Therefore, although we cannot distinguish at what level (intraspecific or interspecific) reinforcement has operated, our comparative study demonstrates that natural selection against maladaptive matings is likely to have caused widespread divergence in pre-zygotic isolating characters between sympatric species of Agrodiaetus, and could have led to speciation.”1Lukhtanov et al., “Reinforcement of pre-zygotic isolation and karyotype evolution in Agrodiaetus butterflies,” Nature 436, 385-389 (21 July 2005) | doi: 10.1038/nature03704.Ironic that Julianna Kettlewell has the same surname as the infamous researcher of peppered moths (see 06/25/2004 entry).  This article doesn’t improve much on evolutionary storytelling.  Who is asking how or why the little flying bugs developed team spirit?  Can they even see their own wing patterns, let alone care whether that attractive, sweet-smelling female over there has identical strips?  Seems to be another case of imputing human aesthetic values on bugs.  As long as we’re speculating about butterfly fashion fads, why wouldn’t they just as easily be saying, vive la difference?    The authors of the paper note that “empirical evidence has been sufficiently scarce to raise doubts about the importance of reinforcement in nature.”  Their own case is full of speculation and doubt.  So is this the best that evolutionists can do, 146 years after The Origin of Species supposedly settled the issue?  Look how excited they all get over a few wing styles, and how eagerly they want to invoke the magic phrase natural selection to help Charlie get a little credit.  They should be worried (see next entry).(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_imgExplore the nuances of cutting comedy and drama together with experienced comedy editor Kent Kincannon in the Sundance 2019’s “Before You Know It.”As any standup comic or improv comedian can tell you, sometimes the funniest moments come from the darkest places. Before You Know It, which premiered at Sundance 2019, directed by and starring Hannah Pearl Utt (co-written and co-starred with her real-life friend Jen Tullock), explores the odd complexities between humor and everyday tragedy.The Sundance website describes the film as “equal parts madcap comedy, adult coming-of-age story, and poignant drama, Before You Know It gleefully defies categorization, and that is its genius.”We sat down with veteran comedy editor Kent Kincannon to talk about his improv roots and editing a feature on Adobe Premiere Pro. We explored how he found his way into mainstream comedy editing and working with Pearl Utt to craft a feature that is real and intriguing, while still finding the funny. PB: Would you suggest your way to others?KK: I’d kind of like to take some editing classes. In a way I wish I had made it up through the assistant editor world so that you could have mentors and pay your dues, but I’ve found success just jumping into it on my path.PB: Coming from comedy, what were the challenges in editing something with more drama and tragedy?KK: I had to lean on Hannah a lot for a lot of the drama. There’s a lot of mental illness, codependency, family shit going on in the movie that’s kind of familiar. I have my own brand of Texan “don’t talk about your problems” stuff, so I didn’t understand as well as Hannah did on a lot of the character motivations and stuff.It’s really just deciding what really needs to be on the screen in any given scene. “Why is Rachel acting like this?” kind of questions. She was there with me the whole time, and it was a fun dialogue where we even could work through things just by me asking questions for motivations.Cover image via Before You Know It (Sundance).You can find out more about Kent Kincannon at his website.Looking for more editing advice and filmmaking interviews? Check out some of these.Streamline Your Film or Video Project with an Assistant EditorThe Story Behind Editing a Movie About Dungeons & DragonsIn Sundance Movie Paddleton, Limited Space and Time Yield A Genuine BromanceHow to Cut an Effective Trailer for Your Next Film or VideoInterview: Composer Dan Marocco of Brooklyn Nine-Nine PremiumBeat: Tell us about Before You Know It.Kent Kincannon: Before You Know It is very much from the mind of Hannah. It’s co-written by her best friend and co-star Jen Tullock. It’s very specific to her life and theater, being homeschooled, and really interesting flavor that’s alien to me. I grew up in Texas, and she grew up in Santa Barbara. A lot of the themes and characters were pretty different from what I usually think about or edit.I’m usually just comedy as much as possible, so it was a fun challenge to get into her head. The movie is just like, I don’t know. Someone described it as “trauma-dy” they lose a family member, and the characters have to figure out their lives.PB: How did you originally get into editing?KK: I was in Austin, and I moved to New York after working an office job for years. I wasn’t doing much film stuff in Austin, so I went to New York and fell into improv comedy pretty quickly. At the UCB theater, I started making videos. Like, you know, people’s web series and sketches. I got on a house team and ended up working with a lot of funny people who have TV shows now, just from doing improv in New York.The UCB sketch team job led to a job at College Humor. Which is a big thing; I remember being on the internet and seeing it for years. It was the coolest job ever, and when they moved to LA, I moved with them. A sketch I made there became a TV show, and that TV show got me in the union, and since then I’ve been able to stay in connection with people I’ve met through comedy. It’s been a pretty interesting, slow and steady climb from comedy videos to Sundance now.PB: Do you have any advice for getting into comedy editing?KK: It’s really hard to edit comedy alone. And I know that’s what a lot of people end up doing at first. Finding people who are good at it, or better at it (preferably than you are) who want to do it with you is really the way to do it. At the UCB theater, nobody I knew had any money. But everybody would make themselves available to work for free because videos were exposure. You could get really good talent, and that attracted professional-level work so that people would hope to get paid one day down the line.I’d say go to your local comedy theaters or clubs and on the lower end and offering to do free work for people from your favorite sketch shows. That’s kind of the entry level, but it’s true at every level.PB: Where did you learn to edit?KK: I went to film school, but I mostly took film theory classes. I always just made stuff. There was a film club where we made videos and challenged each other every week to do in-camera movies or other fun kind of projects. It’s really just from high school until now, just figuring it out and plowing through it trying to find bigger and bigger stuff.last_img read more

first_imgGovernor Bhagat Singh Koshyari is at the receiving end of the ire of political parties, which have demanded an increase in financial relief to nearly one crore rain-affected farmers in Maharashtra. On a day the Supreme Court criticised the State government for not implementing the previously announced assistance for the rain-hit Sangli and Kolhapur regions, the Shiv Sena, Congress and Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) on Monday demanded that the norms set by the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF) be expanded to give more help to farmers. By the end of the day, the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) had joined the chorus for a hike in compensation, along with the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP), which demanded the relief amount be matched to the ₹50,000 given by the Delhi government. Sources in the Governor’s office said the package announced last week is already beyond what is recommended by the NDRF norms. The Governor on Saturday announced ₹8,000 per hectare up to two hectares for agricultural Kharif crops and ₹18,000 per hectare up to two hectares for horticulture/ perennial crops. This is a hike from the ₹6,800 per hectare suggested for agricultural Kharif crops, and an increase in the upper limit in all categories from ₹16,800 to ₹18,000. “The declared amount is already hiked and there is little margin for more improvement,” an official from the Governor’s office said. The Shiv Sena has demanded that the amount be hiked to ₹25,000 per hectare. The party held a protest outside Parliament on Monday, while an editorial in its mouthpiece, Saamana, criticised the Governor for the “low” amount. The Congress and NCP, too, have demanded compensation of more than ₹20,000. The AAP has gone a step ahead. Preeti Sharma Menon, national executive member of the party, said, “The Governor has announced ₹8,000 and ₹18,000 per hectare for Kharif crops and horticulture crops respectively, which is a pittance when compared to ₹50,000 per hectare, the highest in the country awarded by the AAP government in Delhi. The AAP demands that given the large-scale devastation of the Kharif crops due to unseasonal rain, the government declare ₹50,000 per acre as compensation for farmers immediately.”Senior officials said the assessment of the crop damage took time due to the model code of conduct being in place for the Assembly elections. This after aA Cabinet sub-committee headed by the then chief minister Devendra Fadnavis had approved ₹10,000 crore to provide immediate assistance to farmers. But the decision could not be formalised with the imposition of President’s Rule. According to an official estimate, major damage has been to corn, millet, and cotton crops. Senior officials said the overall relief package is worth near ₹8,000 crore to cover crop damage spread over 89 lakh hectares in Vidarbha, Marathwada, and parts of western Maharashtra.last_img read more

first_imgThe images above show Egbert Wagenborg, a multipurpose ship (MPP) owned by Dutch shipowner and operator Royal Wagenborg, transiting the sea locks in Delfzijl. Egbert Wagenborg was towed from Royal Niestern Sander shipyard to the Port of Delfzijl.This ice-strengthened MPP vessel of the EasyMax type is said to be the largest vessel ever built at the shipyard.The 14,200 dwt Egbert Wagenborg features a length of 149.5 meters and a width of 15.9 meters.The vessel will be delivered to the owner in April 2017 when christening and name giving are also scheduled to take place, according to Wagenborg.last_img read more