first_imgResidents along the Berbice River have lambasted the current Administration for turning its back on them following their victory at the polls in 2015.This is according to Hansel Vandenburg, a man who campaigned heavily for the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) coalition at the last elections.Hansel VandenburgThe residents are from Regions Five (Mahaica-Berbice), Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne) while most are from Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice).The area was considered campaign ground for the coalition before the 2015 National and Regional Elections. But after the coalition won, they pocketed the promises they made to those residents and no member of Government has visited them since.“I didn’t ask for an office or a position in the Government to run nothing. All I am asking for is for those people to handle these situations and issues which we voted for and fought for to bring this country to a place where it is tidy and clean. That is my vision and what I am here for. I have not seen any improvements. They have failed us. They have failed us miserable,” Vandenburg stated.Vandenburg said he campaigned against the previous Administration hoping to have a better Guyana.“I took rain. I took dew day and night with people in my hand down the Berbice River campaigning that our present Government in office to stamp out irregularities but I have seen no improvement so far. My labour has gone to waste. I voted for those people to stamp out these kinds of irregularities. I really would like someone to give an ear to this and to the blockage of the River,” Vandenburg added.He said while the people of Hururu continue to block the River, Government has not acted in a responsible manner. “No one seems to give a voice up to now. The question is why?”Residents of Hururu, situated about 4km from RUSAL’s main mine at Kurubuka, have blocked a section of the Berbice River with wire ropes and nets to prevent any vessel from going up or down the River.This, they said, is an act of protest against the mining company at which most of the residents have found employment. But persons doing logging in the upper Berbice River are also being affected.In recent months, Guyanese have come forward bashing the Government for lack of vision.last_img read more

first_imgBasizeni School learners discover the joys of playground equipment for the first time. On the roundabout are Retshepile Mbonani and Zinhle Ngcobo. (Image: Casual Day)In celebration of National Child Protection Week, children at a school for special needs can now enjoy swings and a roundabout custom-designed for wheelchair-bound learners.Casual Day is an annual fundraising project that encourages people to dress differently for work for a day. To earn this right, they make a donation of R10 for the official Casual Day sticker. Proceeds benefit people with disabilities.Through the campaign, wheelchair swings and a roundabout custom-designed for children in wheelchairs were installed at Basizeni Special School in eMbalenhle, Evander, in Mpumalanga. The playground equipment has brought much happiness to the pupils.“They were purchased with the proceeds of last year’s Casual Day donations and are bringing joy to our wheelies,” said Mariette Botha, a Basizeni staffer.The school was the top performer in the province on the day, raising R115 590 in donations from the public.“A portion of the donations [is] utilised by the school and the remainder goes to create awareness of persons with disabilities countrywide. We are very proud that not only did we benefit but that we are able to make a contribution to the disability sector nationally. Our contribution was a significant R69 558.”A better playgroundThe Casual Day funds have been put towards playground development and the school has already done some upgrades.“I wish I could convey the joy on the faces of the children when they experience the swings for the first time,” Botha said. “As a teacher at Basizeni I feel humbled and privileged to be involved at this school. Our mission is to make a difference. Disabled learners and Differently abled learners at Basizeni School have many challenges, but with our new principal, Mrs Mirriam Rampai, at the helm we are prepared to face them.“The school is 21 years old and needs maintenance inside and outside. The focus is on developing and creating classrooms, workshops, playground and sport environments with the necessary educational equipment, giving each learner the opportunity to develop to his or her full potential.”Basizeni had positive, enthusiastic staff members and joyful pupils, she added. The only obstacle standing in the way of them achieving their vision was funding. [But] we are entering a new phase, revamping the campus and getting a bus.”“It is a privilege to apply my expertise to improve the lives of young children with special needs,” said Louis Botha, the chairman of the school governing body. “We are committed to improving life skills to provide a space for every learner.”Casual DayFind your local Casual Day organisation and see how you can help. To support Basizeni School, call Mariette Botha on 082 459 1009.This year, Casual Day is on Friday, 2 September, and the theme is “Up Your Game”. So get casual for a cause and help change lives one wheelchair at a time.The funds are raised through a R10 donation for a Casual Day sticker. Keep abreast of activities at Casual Day on its Facebook page and on Twitter at @CasualDay_SA.last_img read more

first_imgNew Delhi: A national capital school has topped the rankings for government day schools in the country, while two others have made it to the first 10 in the rankings released by an education portal, a statement from the Delhi government said on Saturday.The government-run Rajkiya Pratibha Vikas Vidyalaya (RPVV), Sector 10, Dwarka, has been ranked no. 1 in the India School Ranking 2019 released by Education World (EW), a portal for educators, teachers and parents which comes out with rankings for schools every year, the statement said. Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal congratulated teachers and principals of these schools for their efforts. Also Read – After eight years, businessman arrested for kidnap & murder”A Delhi govt school in Dwarka has been named the best govt school in the country. Two more are in the Top 10. Congrats to all teachers, principals and officials. It is your effort that has made Delhi proud today,” he tweeted. Rajkiya Pratibha Vikas Vidyalaya(RPVV) , Sector 10, Dwarka was ranked the best in India in the government day school category for a second consecutive year, the statement said. Kendriya Vidyalaya, IIT Madras, Chennai; and GVHSS for Girls, Nadakkavu, Kozhikode, are joint second, followed by Kendriya Vidyalaya, IIT Bombay, Powai at number 3. Delhi government’s RPVV Lajpat Nagar and Rohini have also improved their rankings. While RPVV Lajpat Nagar has jumped one position and is now ranked as fifth, RPVV Rohini got into the top 10 and is now at 7th, the statement said.last_img read more

first_imgQUEBEC — The struggling Parti Quebecois has suffered another setback with a decision by the Speaker relegating it to fourth place in the provincial legislature.Francois Paradis ruled today that the departure of Catherine Fournier, who last week quit the PQ to sit as an Independent, means the party is now officially the third opposition party behind the Liberals and Quebec solidaire.For the first time since its creation in 1968, the PQ is no longer the leading sovereigntist party in the national assembly, eclipsed by the 13-year-old Quebec solidaire.Fournier said she had lost faith in the PQ’s ability to achieve independence. Her departure left the PQ with nine seats compared with 10 for Quebec solidaire. The Liberals have 29.The PQ had argued it should maintain its status as the second opposition party because that was what had been decided in an all-party agreement reached last November after the election won by the Coalition Avenir Quebec.The reduced status means the PQ will have less speaking time in the legislature and will be moved to the back of the opposition benches.The Canadian Presslast_img read more