first_imgResidents along the Berbice River have lambasted the current Administration for turning its back on them following their victory at the polls in 2015.This is according to Hansel Vandenburg, a man who campaigned heavily for the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) coalition at the last elections.Hansel VandenburgThe residents are from Regions Five (Mahaica-Berbice), Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne) while most are from Region 10 (Upper Demerara-Berbice).The area was considered campaign ground for the coalition before the 2015 National and Regional Elections. But after the coalition won, they pocketed the promises they made to those residents and no member of Government has visited them since.“I didn’t ask for an office or a position in the Government to run nothing. All I am asking for is for those people to handle these situations and issues which we voted for and fought for to bring this country to a place where it is tidy and clean. That is my vision and what I am here for. I have not seen any improvements. They have failed us. They have failed us miserable,” Vandenburg stated.Vandenburg said he campaigned against the previous Administration hoping to have a better Guyana.“I took rain. I took dew day and night with people in my hand down the Berbice River campaigning that our present Government in office to stamp out irregularities but I have seen no improvement so far. My labour has gone to waste. I voted for those people to stamp out these kinds of irregularities. I really would like someone to give an ear to this and to the blockage of the River,” Vandenburg added.He said while the people of Hururu continue to block the River, Government has not acted in a responsible manner. “No one seems to give a voice up to now. The question is why?”Residents of Hururu, situated about 4km from RUSAL’s main mine at Kurubuka, have blocked a section of the Berbice River with wire ropes and nets to prevent any vessel from going up or down the River.This, they said, is an act of protest against the mining company at which most of the residents have found employment. But persons doing logging in the upper Berbice River are also being affected.In recent months, Guyanese have come forward bashing the Government for lack of vision.last_img read more

2011Charl Schwartzel+0.90190.0596 In the chart above, you can see that the same general pattern holds for every tier of the money list: Higher-earning players gain more strokes with their long games, while lower-earning ones lose more strokes the same way — and the impact of putting is relatively muted by comparison.This, of course, flies in the face of “drive for show, putt for dough.” Putts do constitute the plurality of shots on tour — they make up around 40 percent of all strokes — so in hindsight, it’s not surprising that the conventional wisdom says putting is the primary separator of wheat from chaff. But with the advent of modern analytics, we can see that the long game is more important on average.A good long game usually wins at AugustaUnfortunately, the Masters itself does not keep tournament-level strokes-gained statistics. But we can look at Masters winners’ stats from other PGA Tour events3Again, excluding tournaments for which ShotLink data was not available. during the same seasons, in search of patterns of play that may translate well at Augusta National.The course is famous for its slick, undulating greens, which might suggest that it rewards putting skill. But going back to 2004 again, only three of the past 13 Masters winners have ranked among the top 10 in putting strokes gained during the year they donned the green jacket — and two of those players (Spieth and Tiger Woods) were equally elite according to strokes gained: tee-to-green. Meanwhile, six of the 13 winners were actually below-average putters according to strokes gained. (Strokes gained measures everything relative to average, so negative totals mean a player was below-average.)On the other hand, eight of the 13 winners ranked among the top 10 in strokes gained: tee-to-green, and all 13 winners were above-average tee-to-green players in the seasons they won. TEE-TO-GREEN ENTIRE SEASONPUTTING ENTIRE SEASON 2006Phil Mickelson+1.6940.2740 2009Angel Cabrera+0.37630.1763 2005Tiger Woods+1.7440.665 2012Bubba Watson+1.813-0.28160 YEARMASTERS CHAMPIONSTROKES GAINED PER ROUNDRANKSTROKES GAINED PER ROUNDRANK Masters winners have better long games than putting strokes Statistics and rankings are for the PGA Tour season in which a player won the Masters (excluding tournaments where ShotLink data was unavailable). Willett did not play enough PGA Tour rounds in 2016 to have an official rank.Source: PGA Tour 2013Adam Scott+1.345-0.03108 2010Phil Mickelson+1.155-0.15133 2015Jordan Spieth+1.5840.579 2007Zach Johnson+0.42600.665 2008Trevor Immelman+0.6731-0.68191 2004Phil Mickelson+1.415-0.09128 Masters rookie Jon Rahm, 22, heads to Augusta this week with history decidedly not on his side: No player making his debut at the tournament has won it since Fuzzy Zoeller in 1979. But the Spanish golfer does have a secret weapon of sorts, one that might help him overcome the weight of history. So far this season, he ranks second on the PGA Tour — ahead of the likes of Jason Day and Jordan Spieth — in a statistical category called “strokes gained: tee-to-green” that measures how well a player hits the ball on all shots other than putts. And despite Augusta National’s longtime reputation as a putting test, it’s this ball-striking ability that will likely determine who wins this week — just like it does every other week on tour.How to gain (and lose) strokesBefore we can isolate the quality of a player’s long game, we need a framework for evaluating every single shot he takes. That’s where “strokes gained” comes in: Developed by Mark Broadie, a business professor at Columbia University,1Broadie formalized the concept in a 2010 paper called “Assessing Golfer Performance on the PGA TOUR.” the statistic uses data from ShotLink — a laser-tracking system that records the location of the ball on every shot — to estimate how many strokes a typical player would need to get the ball into the hole from any given spot on the course. In turn, those numbers can be used to evaluate every player on the PGA Tour, by comparing his performance on each incremental shot in a round to the average.Here’s an example: Let’s say a player tees off on a hole where the average is 4.2 strokes to hole out. He hits a great drive down the middle, his ball coming to rest in a spot on the fairway from which the average player would take an additional 2.8 strokes to hole out. In other words, that one shot essentially did the work of 1.4 shots by an average player — his drive “gained” him 0.4 strokes on the field.2Mathematically, a shot’s contribution to strokes gained equals the expected strokes to hole out before hitting the shot minus the expected strokes to hole out after hitting the shot, minus one (for the stroke the player actually took). Add up these marginal gains and losses, and you get a sense of not only who the best players are, but also why they’re so great — where on the course they gain their edge over the field.The PGA Tour breaks “strokes gained” down into four categories: off the tee, approaching the green, around the green and putting. There are also two aggregate categories: total strokes gained, which is the sum of all categories, and strokes gained: tee-to-green, which is the sum of the non-putting categories. Each stroke a player gains is important, but the driving and approach categories — the ones Rahm excels in — are where great players separate themselves the most from their peers.“Drive for show, putt for dough” is a mythThere’s an old golf adage, attributed to four-time major winner Bobby Locke (who was renowned for his putting ability), that you “drive for show and putt for dough.” In other words, even though long shots are flashy and crowd-pleasing, putting is what wins tournaments. But the data makes clear that the top players gain more strokes from their long games than from their short games.To investigate this, I gathered stats from every PGA Tour season (excluding the handful of tournaments where ShotLink data wasn’t tracked) since 2004 — the first season for which “strokes gained” was calculated — and separated players into groups based on their ranking on the tour’s money list for each season. By taking the average strokes gained for each group, I found that players who finish among the top 10 on the money list average about 1.5 strokes gained per round, which break down by category like this:0.4 strokes gained off the tee0.6, approaching the green0.2, around the green0.3, puttingMost great players gain the majority of their strokes with their full-swing shots. By comparison, putts and shots around the green make up a comparatively small amount of their strokes gained in a given round. Here’s the breakdown of where players gain and lose strokes based on how they rank on the money list: 2016Danny Willett+0.83—0.17— 2014Bubba Watson+1.407-0.05109 This doesn’t mean that the winners didn’t putt well during the Masters itself — the eventual champion usually finishes among the top 10 in the field (at worst) in terms of fewest putts — but it does mean that, for the most part, they weren’t consistently great putters.Just like in my earlier analysis of the top earners, players who finished in the top five at the Masters since 2004 gained the most strokes per round during the season as a whole from their approach shots (where they picked up a shade under half of their total strokes gained), followed by their tee shots, putts and chips or pitches around the green.All of this bodes well for Rahm and his fellow long hitters at Augusta. Although golf is a difficult sport to predict, recent Masters results suggest that players with great long games and middling short games are more likely to finish high on the leaderboard than players with great short games and unremarkable long games. In turn, that explains why Rahm belongs right in the conversation with the likes of Rory McIlroy and Dustin Johnson as Masters favorites — especially since they also perform extremely well in strokes gained from tee to green.4Johnson leads the PGA Tour in the category, while McIlroy would be No. 1 if he’d played enough rounds to qualify. (Rahm’s countryman Sergio Garcia, who ranks third in the metric, isn’t a bad dark-horse pick either.)There is more than one way to be successful in a high-variance game like golf, and players such as Brandt Snedeker and Luke Donald have enjoyed success primarily because of stellar short-game skills, not powerful long games (as measured by strokes gained). But on average, the top PGA Tour players tend to gain many more strokes from their drives and approach shots than their chips and putts — even at a place like Augusta National, known for its lightning-fast greens. So the next time you hear somebody talk about driving for show and putting for dough, remember that the longest clubs in the bag are the ones that put the most money into the pros’ pockets. read more

first_img This year, the trend continues with the loss in sales in smaller retailers and the declining sales of smaller titles. This has a huge influence on the overall sales numbers; there were more than 8,000 fewer retail accounts being serviced in the first quarter of this year in contrast to last. The top ten chains in Q1 2015 represented 53.3 percent of total sales, compared to a collective market share of 51.8 percent in 2014. This is a trend that will likely continue as smaller retail stores exit the business. Although there will likely be no major turnaround in the foreseeable future, MagNet notes that decisions being made by publishers to reduce their allocations, partially driven by wholesaler demands for subsidies, are having a substantial impact on the steady sales decline. That comes in addition to the rise in social media and mobile technology in influencing how consumers view and absorb content. The Top 100 chains’ combined sales beat the overall business trends, which again indicates that the industry is losing smaller retailers. But the publishers who performed well in the first quarter all followed the same formula: more releases. Many of these publishers also tacked on higher cover prices, like Penny Press, which had 13 percent more releases, and an average cover price increase of about 23 percent.  Time Inc.’s numbers benefitted from more book-a-zine releases under their THEI brand, as well as the higher cover price on People. Harris Publications also increased their number of releases and focused more on book-a-zine products. Overall, the average cover price of a unit sold in the first quarter increased by 36 cents (more than 7 percent). Two factors contributed to this jump: 1) higher cover prices on many of the weekly titles, and 2) the continued publisher focus on book-a-zines with cover prices startingat $9.99. These factors helped drive the average cover price on a unit sold to an all-time high, which is one of the few good signs for the industry—consumers are willing to pay higher prices for quality printed magazines. center_img Although it’s easy to fall back on saying “social media is to blame,” publishers also need to reassess their releases—how often to distribute and how much are they going to charge according to MagNet’s 2015 Q1 Newsstand Sales Results. Magazine unit and dollar sales improved slightly in the first quarter to declines of 14.2 percent and 8.3 percent, respectively, compared to drops of 15.6 percent and 9 percent in the prior quarter. The average dollar sales decline of the Top 25 titles was mitigated this quarter by the higher cover prices on the weekly titles. Even though the newsstand sales environment is bleak, decisions being made by publishers have a major impact. So keep producing quality content but perhaps release it in a higher quality product and quit reducing your allocations, as MagNet suggests doing the opposite has proven to only be beneficial.last_img read more

first_img For us, that’s a challenge. If The New York Times Magazine is putting Nicki Minaj on its cover or T Magazine is putting Rihanna on its cover during the same cycle as us, we want to make sure that the way we’re covering that story is innovative, unique and high quality. For us, having Rihanna on our cover at the same time as Vanity Fair and T Magazine, I feel like our story really held up. That’s what this year has been about for us, challenging ourselves not to just be a good music magazine or a good looking magazine, but to be one of the best culture magazines out there.  Folio: There was a time when a huge, global pop star like Rihanna might have only wanted to appear on the cover of Vanity Fair, for example, and it seems that’s no longer the case. Is that reflective of a changing landscape in magazine media? Folio: Going back to the digital growth—where are you seeing all this new traffic coming in from? Folio: For starters, to what do you attribute all of this growth in digital? Is there anything you’ve been doing differently? Some of our biggest stories in the past year have absolutely been magazine stories. We had an amazing run with Fader 100 where we had two incredible cover stories, but also just a ton of excellent content that we created for the magazine that’s all done really well online. We had an exciting cover story with Zayn Malik, which for The Fader was kind of a departure, but also super in line with the history of the best stuff The Fader does, which is to talk to an artist early on in a project and take time to learn where their head is at. That Zayn story was a classic Fader story, and we were happy to bring the Fader approach to a new audience with that one. For music and culture magazine The Fader, the end of 2015 saw the release of the brand’s landmark 100th issue, the digitization of its complete archive through a partnership with BitTorrent, and unprecedented digital growth. Combined traffic across desktop and mobile jumped 33 percent year-over-year, and October 2015, the month the 100th issue was released, was the highest-traffic month in the magazine’s sixteen-year history. Our goal has been to move away from that MP3 blog model. We saw so much potential in The Fader’s brand and the way that The Fader has always looked at music, which is using music as a prism to learn more about the entire world and youth culture and technology. It’s been a process both of staffing up and working with everyone here to improve day-to-day writing and editing skills. We’re still a small staff and we will lean on each other to create most of the content. To some extent, we’ve just been in blogging boot camp all together, and trying to do magazine-quality stuff every day. Folio: caught up with Naomi Zeichner, editor-in-chief, to get a glimpse of what’s behind The Fader’s growth and what’s next for the brand. Folio: Looking back at that Fader 100 issue, was featuring well-established stars like Drake or Rihanna a departure for the brand? Naomi Zeichner: We’ve been doing everything differently over the past year or so. I don’t mean to say we’ve switched our entire approach or model, but The Fader at its inception and for many years on the internet was a great MP3 blog; that was the bread and butter of our business, and then we had this separate magazine that we were doing, and those stories would also always go online, but there were only so many of them. Zeichner: The Fader has always been all about balance. I don’t think The Fader has ever shied away from pop music. Drake and Rihanna are both established artists, but also artists who constantly have their hands in what’s next in culture and are supporting or feeding off of young artists, so they’re very much in our world. It was about looking back, but we also think those artists are really vital and interesting right now. It was the same for Zayn; Zayn was a pop star who was actively trying to wheel himself back into a smaller, more meaningful world. We thought that was an interesting story and it says a lot about the status of the boundaries between indie and pop. Zeichner: Yes, we have each issue up for free download as part of our bundle now, and then you’ll be able to purchase the entire archive. I went to an art show recently where these kids had created a whole wall out of Fader photography that they got from the archive bundle when it was free, and that was a really cool moment for me. Some of our early magazines still exist in this office only on compact discs as quark files, so knowing that the archive was digitized and made available is really amazing. Zeichner: This year, we have a fuller stable of editors than ever. A joke that I make with my deputy is that we taught each other “folk journalism.” We aren’t people who went to journalism school, but all of a sudden we have this infusion of people who have worked at amazing places and are some of the best editors in the business. Their specialties aren’t only in music. They’re people who love music and love culture, but also are really ambitious writers about politics, sports, technology, identity—things like that. I’m looking forward to those editors both improving the overall quality of our magazine stories and also making sure that we have more non-music, high-quality stories that we’re breaking in our magazine, as well as just bringing in more freelancers and more people into the Fader network. Folio: Your BitTorrent partnership resulted in over one million downloads for the Fader 100 issue. Can we expect more promotions like that in the future? Zeichner: Not exactly, but we are thinking about how to use social platforms for native content. These days, when an artist visits the office, what we’re doing with them for our Snapchat story is one of the first things we think about. A few years ago when we did our redesign for our site, we built it mobile-first, and we’re going to introduce a couple of tweaks to the mobile design in a couple weeks, making sure that all of our articles—whether it’s a long-form magazine article or something that’s more newsy or more listy—is really pleasant to read on your phone, and that you’re able to easily navigate around the day’s content on your phone. That sort of user experience is really important to us, but we aren’t necessarily tailoring content towards social. Folio: What are some ways in which that affects your editorial strategy? Are you tailoring content for different social platforms? Zeichner: Just like other publishers, we’re seeing a ton of traffic directly from Facebok. For us, I would say Twitter is a larger audience than for some other publications, I think because music readers still hang out on Twitter, which is awesome. We’ve seen a huge increase in mobile traffic. We also see a lot of direct traffic, which is coming from people texting each other links, or when people put links in their Instagram bios, which for us is an exciting metric. Folio: So what’s next? How will you top those numbers in 2016? Zeichner: Absolutely. I think a print magazine cover at this point is such a feather in the hat. There are so few print magazine covers, and we’re just really proud that people still feel that a Fader cover, as a symbol, is a currency that they want to be a part of, and that it still means something. These distinctions between a high-brow thing and a low-brow thing, or a popular thing and an underground thing, might go away. Lots of publications are now operating with that understanding. Last year we saw huge traffic growth when we were able to meaningfully weigh in on a cultural moment. When Meek Mill and Drake were fighting, we had a million posts that were different from posts that you’d see elsewhere on the internet, and that’s where we really saw growth. Looking at things like the election, and even the Grammy’s coming up, we want to make sure that we have the best coverage and all different types of coverage. Now we have coverage coming from our UK office, and we also have someoene in Canada starting, so we’re looking forward to broadening the types of stories we tell. More on this topic The Fader Releases Full Archive on BitTorrent A Look at The FADER’s Expansion Plans Folio: Week in Review – January 30, 2016 How Runner’s World is Connecting with Audiences Like Never Before Inside Harvard Business Review’s Plans to Boost High-Frequency Traffic Selling Positivity: A Look Inside Condé Nast AuroraJust In Shanker Out, Litterick In as CEO of EnsembleIQ Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move Meredith Corp. Makes Digital-Side Promotions | People on the Move This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV NetworksPowered bylast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Minister of state (independent charge) for Women & Child Development & Social Welfare Shashi Panja on Tuesday said the government is setting up six new adoption centres in the state.The state presently has 24 adoption centres covering all the districts in the state that are managed by non-governmental organisations. However, the entire funding for functioning of these centres are borne by the state government.”The six new centres will come up in Paschim Medinipur, Alipurduar, Hooghly, Howrah, Jalpaiguri and Purulia. It will be directly managed and financed by the government,” said Panja. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe minister on Tuesday inaugurated a new adoption centre at Manikpara in Jhargram. “This adoption centre meets all the criteria of The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015,” Panja said. The Jhargram adoption centre has 10 children.The minister will hold district level meeting on review of Adoption and ICDS matters in the district on Wednesday with all the concerned officials. The various schemes like Kanyashree, Rupasree and Manobik will be reviewed by the minister.The adoption centres in the state take care of a child up to an age of six and during this period it ensures that it is handed over to a couple who wants to adopt the child.last_img read more

first_imgNo flights in or out of Greece for 4 days if strike proceeds Tags: Greece, Travel Alert ATHENS — More strikes are expected to disrupt travel in Europe, this time in the island nation of Greece.According to the Daily Mail, Greek air traffic controllers plan to walk off the job starting Oct. 9 for four days to protest changes to their job descriptions. Their union confirmed on Wednesday they would stage 24-hour strikes on Oct. 9, 10 and Oct. 12-13 inclusive, and that all flights would be suspended except for emergency and search-and rescue flights, plus those through the Athens Flight Information region.The main issue at hand is draft legislation that seeks to introduce changes to the structure of the civil aviation department, which will act as a watchdog and deal with regulatory issues. The air traffic controllers are demanding that some articles of the draft law be withdrawn.“This was a last chance for a proper reform. Instead, they are pursuing changes which will shut us down in a year or two,” said a member of the air traffic controllers union board. “They are undermining our sector and they never consulted with us.”More news:  Flight Centre Travel Group takes full ownership of Quebec-based agencyThe 170-page proposed law will be discussed in parliament on Thursday. Posted by Travelweek Group center_img Share Thursday, October 6, 2016 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more