first_imgMission Hills Group will design and build the school and its six indoor courts, but it will be operated by NBA China.The NBA already has three training academies in China for top male and female prospects.NBA China chief executive David Shoemaker said in a Mission Hills press statement: “This groundbreaking NBA Basketball School in Haikou further builds upon our commitment to developing young basketball talent in China. “We are delighted that Mission Hills Group shares our vision and are thrilled to have the opportunity to contribute to the government’s pledge to grow a sporting culture in Hainan Province.”Hainan, sometimes referred to as China’s equivalent of Hawaii, already hosts a Barcelona football academy, also in partnership with Mission Hills.ADVERTISEMENT Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:08Smash hit? Tesla suffers broken glass mishap at launch of new truck07:50BYS Academy: Create a Fall Glam Makeup Look01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding PH chess team eyes 7 golds or more in 2017 ASEAN Para Games BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Along with football, basketball is the most popular sport in China and Bryant said the new facility — construction begins later this year — will be a boon to the Chinese game.“The Chinese youth will benefit from a complete approach to player development that combines NBA-quality coaching with NBA-level training,” said the retired five-time NBA champion.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I believe this partnership will lift the game of basketball to a higher level in China.”The 39-year-old was in the city of Haikou, on the southern Chinese island of Hainan, to unveil the project.center_img Retired basketball superstar Kobe Bryant enjoying himself during his Mamba Mentality Tour on Saturday night, June 25, 2016, at Araneta Coliseum in Cubao. Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLos Angeles Lakers legend Kobe Bryant announced plans Tuesday for China’s first NBA basketball school, a development the 18-time All-Star says will improve the game in the country.The NBA Basketball School-Mission Hills Haikou will be open to male and female players from junior up to professional level after its completion in 2019 and could help unearth the next Chinese basketball star.ADVERTISEMENT E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Read Next LATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ View commentslast_img read more

first_imgJuventus chief Fabio Paratici named Sporting Director of the Yearby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveJuventus sports chief Fabio Paratici has collected an award at the Globe Soccer Awards.Paratici was named Best Sporting Director of the Year in Dubai.“I am very happy and it is a great honour to receive this award. I would like to thank the club and my staff,” said Paratici on the stage.“Juventus are a great club with an incredible history and I am happy and proud to work for this club.“I think Juventus are experiencing one of the best moments of its history. We’ve won so many titles in recent years, built a competitive squad and added Cristiano Ronaldo, so we must continue along this path.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgREVEALED: Spurs were keen to keep new Napoli hero Llorenteby Carlos Volcanoa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveTottenham were prepared to hand Fernando Llorente a new deal this season – but delays allowed Napoli to snap him up, it has been revealed.Llorente already has three goals with Napoli and is fast proving a transfer coup.Gazzetta dello Sport says Llorente, having seen his contract expire, was informed by Spurs that a new deal would be tabled before the start of the season.But having learned it would be on reduced terms, the veteran started shopping himself around and was soon convinced after a series of phone calls with Napoli coach Carlo Ancelotti.With the Azzurri offering €5m-a-year and Spurs dithering, Llorente was persuaded to move to Naples.The former Juventus striker has made an instant impact and is already being celebrated across the national press. TagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your say WATCH: Chelsea winger Hudson-Odoi’s brilliant brace for England U21sby Ansser Sadiq9 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveCallum Hudson-Odoi scored two brilliant goals in England U21’s 5-1 win over Austria on Tuesday.The Chelsea winger converted a difficult volley to open to scoring for Aidy Boothroyd’s side.His second goal was a display of sublime speed and dribbling as he travelled more than half of the pitch before dispatching the ball into the top-corner.
Arsenal’s Eddie Nketiah collected the match ball after scoring the game’s other three goals.Hudson-Odoi with a great volley. @btsportfootballpic.twitter.com/At5TMN0wZW— Paree (@ACParee) October 15, 2019Watch HUDSON ODOI goal and retweet pic.twitter.com/z4YJWKrljG— Chelsea4Ever (@wadja_roland) October 15, 2019 last_img read more

first_imgUNLV's "TARK" uniform patch.UNLV’s men’s basketball team will honor its former coach, Jerry Tarkanian, with a commemorative patch on their jerseys the remainder of this season. Tarkanian, who coached the Rebels from 1973-92, winning the national championship in 1990, passed away Wednesday morning at the age of 84. UNLV (14-10, 5-6 MWC) will sport a black “TARK” patch, paying tribute to their former coach known to many as “Tark the Shark.” #UNLVmbb will wear patches that look like this the rest of the season pic.twitter.com/NE9lWzsqbR— Taylor Bern (@TaylorBern) February 11, 2015Tarkanian was one of the greatest coaches college basketball has ever seen, recording 729 wins across all divisions. UNLV is set to face Air Force in Colorado on Saturday.last_img read more

first_img Consultant Cardiologist at the Heart Foundation of Jamaica, Dr. Handel Emery, has highlighted the need for more resources to address cardiovascular complications, which account for the majority of diabetes-related deaths.Dr. Emery was speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on January 23, against the background of the observation of Heart Month, under the theme ‘The Diabetic Heart: Are you at Risk?’.“I think it is of paramount importance that we recognise this connection, and direct a lot of our attention to identifying, preventing and treating the cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes,” he emphasised.Dr. Emery said it is important to note that diabetes is extremely common, pointing out that the current data suggest that about 12 per cent of the population over the age of 15 in Jamaica is diabetic.“When you look at the international data, it’s even more alarming,” he noted. The Consultant said that about 400 million persons worldwide are diabetic at present, and the number is expected to grow to about half a billion by 2030.“It is a significant global problem, and whilst there has been a lot of focus given to some of the other complications of diabetes, we tend not to really focus a great deal of effort, energy and resources on the cardiovascular complications associated with it,” Dr. Emery said.He noted that the relationship between diabetes and hypertension is not new, and although the initial accounts were largely anecdotal, “we began to have epidemiologic data which support this association in the form of a very large and important trial called the Framingham Heart Study, which began in 1948”.The Consultant explained that subjects were assessed over a 30-year period, which led to the establishment of associations between particular disease entities.“One of the associations made from the study was that persons who were diabetic were about 200-500 per cent more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than persons who were not diabetic,” he informed.Dr. Emery noted that diabetic persons have a more rapid rate at which fat and cholesterol are deposited in the arterial system, leading to a narrowing of the blood vessels, which limits the flow of blood. This results in the heart muscle being starved of blood, which can lead to angina.He also explained that one may have complete blockage of the vessel, which is a heart attack.“Another way in which diabetes leads to heart failure is that the elevated blood sugars which we see in diabetes can also be directly toxic to heart cells. The heart tissue is not meant to function in an environment where blood sugars are elevated, so if they are chronically exposed to those levels of blood sugar, then there are biochemical consequences such as weakness of the heart muscle, and many patients go on to develop heart failure,” he said. “I think it is of paramount importance that we recognise this connection, and direct a lot of our attention to identifying, preventing and treating the cardiovascular complications associated with diabetes,” he emphasised. Dr. Emery was speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on January 23, against the background of the observation of Heart Month, under the theme ‘The Diabetic Heart: Are you at Risk?’. Consultant Cardiologist at the Heart Foundation of Jamaica, Dr. Handel Emery, has highlighted the need for more resources to address cardiovascular complications, which account for the majority of diabetes-related deaths. Story Highlightslast_img read more

first_img(Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette. APTN/File photo)Jorge Barrera APTN National NewsIndigenous Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette says he plans to vote against his party’s proposed bill to legalize medically assisted dying.Ouellette, who represents a Winnipeg riding, said the decision to vote against the bill is rooted in deeply held spiritual beliefs.“I think symbolically, for the community where I am from, that I will need to demonstrate that I believe in a certain path and that this is the path I am choosing,” said Ouellette, in an interview Wednesday.Ouellette said he doesn’t believe he will face any repercussions from voting against the bill. Liberal MPs are being allowed to vote their conscience on the issue.“I think it’s a very personal thing,” said Ouellette.The Liberal government introduced a bill last week to make medically assisted death legal for consenting adults over 18 years of age. The bill would make assisted death legal for people who are in “an advanced stage of irreversible decline” and suffering from ailments where natural death is “reasonably foreseeable.”The government introduced the bill facing a June 6 deadline set by the Supreme Court which struck down the ban on physician assisted dying last year. The high court said consenting adults suffering from “grievous and irremediable” ailments should be able to seek medically assisted death.Ouellette said the federal government should work around the deadline and delay legalizing assisted death for at least five to 10 years until it’s absolutely clear what sort of impact it would have in all corners of Canadian society.“I think we need to take more time, especially in light of Attawapiskat,” said Ouellette.Attawapiskat, a Cree community in Ontario’s James Bay region, recently declared a state of emergency after suffering through 11 suicide attempts in a 24-hour span.“I think there are communities that have this issue and if you allow, all of a sudden, this to occur…it might be very difficult,” he said. “If grandma, grandfather decides they had enough in life…if they weren’t able to carry on, why should I carry on? If they weren’t strong enough, why should I be strong enough? I think that is a question that is asked in Attawapiskat more often than not and the ripple effect of assisted dying is not the same in Toronto as in other places.”Ouellette said his views are known within the Liberal caucus and to Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould, an Indigenous politician who was a regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations. Wilson-Raybould played a key role in developing the assisted dying bill.“People know my viewpoint on it,” he said.Ouellette said part of his current position on the issue was influenced by a conversation he had with his Sundance chief about three years ago.“We were talking about suicide and he was talking in the lodge about this and he said, ‘Never forget the spirit of suicide, you have to fight the spirit of suicide, make sure it doesn’t come into our lives,’” said Ouellette. “I am afraid if we open this little door right now we won’t be able to fight that suicide spirit.”Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett told reporters this week she didn’t believe the proposed bill, if it becomes law, would impact communities dealing with suicide like Attawapiskat. She said there is some concern medically assisted dying is sometimes referred to as assisted suicide.“The more we can keep that separate, the better,” said Bennett.The House of Commons debate on the bill is scheduled to begin Friday.jbarrera@aptn.ca@JorgeBarrera–with files from Canadian Presslast_img read more

first_imgTamara Pimentel APTN National NewsFor many, what is happening in North Dakota over the Dakota Access pipeline is historic.It’s been more than 100 years since so many Tribes and Nations have come together for a single cause.So why then is APTN and a handful of alternative media the only organizations covering it?tpimentel@aptn.calast_img

first_imgNew Delhi: The Congress has lost all political credibility when it comes to addressing the issue of poverty, Union minister Nitin Gadkari said on Thursday, taking a dig at Rahul Gandhi’s proposed “Nyay” scheme by invoking Congress prime ministers, who, he claimed, had vowed to eradicate poverty and failed. Addressing a press conference at the BJP office here, Gadkari also alleged that the Congress had deliberately created “fear” in the minds of the minorities to divert attention from performance, work and development, which should have been the issues in the ongoing Lok Sabha election. “The Congress party has no credibility. After 1947, (then prime minister Jawaharlal) Nehru said he will remove poverty. Then Indira Gandhi said this. She used the slogan of removing poverty and won (elections), but poverty did not go. Then Rajiv Gandhi repeated that, then Sonia Gandhi and then Manmohan Singh, but poverty did not go. “Now, even Panditji’s (Nehru) great-grandson is saying the same thing. If he (Congress chief Rahul Gandhi) will remove poverty by giving Rs 72,000, then what did Pandit Nehru, Indira Gandhi, Manmohan Singh do? That is why the political credibility of the Congress in removing poverty has ended,” he said. The senior Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) leader further alleged that the Congress had a history of injustice and since 1947, it had been responsible for “wrong economic policies, bad and corrupt governance and visionless leadership”. “So, ‘Nyay’ will not happen, because with justice, the person doling it out should also be trustworthy,” he said. Gadkari also lashed out at the opposition party for the abuse it had meted out to Prime Minister Narendra Modi during its poll campaign and said he had a list of 56 such abuses. “The Congress deliberately wants to ensure that performance and work do not become poll issues. That is why they have done two things. “One, fear is their biggest capital. Create fear in the minds of Dalits, minorities, SCs and STs. Two, ensure that a discussion on the work done in five years, which had not happened in 50 years, does not take place. If the discussion revolves around development, then they know they will be in trouble,” he said. Under the Modi government, the social sector had benefitted immensely, Gadkari said, while talking about opening of bank accounts, roads, water and electricity. “Last time during the Kumbh, the prime minister of Mauritius could not go for a bath in the Ganga…. This time, 20 crore people visited the Kumbh and took bath in the river. For the first time, the Ganga was pure and clean. “We did what we promised. We made the waterways and that is why (Congress leader) Priyanka (Gandhi Vadra) could travel from Prayagraj to Varanasi on a boat while abusing us continuously. I want to ask her, had we not made the waterway, how would she have done that? She could drink the water thrice because we have cleaned the Ganga water. Or else, she would have also had to leave like the Mauritius PM,” the Union minister for road transport and highways said. He said it was unfortunate that those who had promoted the accused in the 1984 anti-Sikh riots, those who had failed to give justice to the victims were now talking about “Nyay”. “The politics of performance and development is our biggest asset. Our schemes have reached every nook and cranny of this country and that is how we want to fight the election. The lowering of the standard of the discourse during this election has been noticed by the people of this country. We will form a BJP-led NDA government with a record mandate,” Gadkari said.last_img read more

first_imgArsenal goalkeeper Bernd Leno has opened up on his error that led to Charlie Austin’s late winner as the Gunners lost 3-2 at St Mary’s Stadium on Sunday.Danny Ings had put Southampton ahead twice only for Henrikh Mkhitaryan to pull level twice, but a rare error by Leno gifted the Saints a late winner as the German goalkeeper came out to clear Shane Long’s cross and couldn’t make good contact with the ball.“The last goal was a little bit unlucky for me,” Bernd told the club’s website.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“I wanted to get the cross because Austin was completely free and it was so close.“No risk, no fun. Maybe next time I will get the ball or I will stay on the line, look at the ball and then nobody says ‘you came out and didn’t get the ball’.“That’s the life of a goalkeeper but I would do it again.”last_img read more

first_imgKnown for a gruff demeanor, Young told the audience he will not change: He will still holler, he will still at times get out of line. But if that happens, he says that action comes from his heart, adding: “My heart is in this House.” Young: “I do believe we are more divided, by the extreme. You hear either the right or the left side, the middle is not being heard because they are not aigated enough.” Young fielded questions from the audience in a nearly 40-minute Q and A session at the Kenai Visitor and Cultural Center. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享Alaska’s sole U.S. Representative was on the Kenai Peninsula on Tuesday speaking at a joint Kenai/Soldotna Chamber of Commerce Luncheon. Representative Don Young, a 40 year veteran in the U.S. Congress, says that he believes the President is trying to get Americans down the right path, but it’s now up to Congress to work together. Young: “The congress itself is not has well organized as it used to be, it’s very partisan. I’ve always been able to work across the aisle and will continue to do that, because they are in the majority now as they were when I first got elected. That’s part of the program of representing the state as a whole. “ Young said during the luncheon that he will be seeking reelection next year. He will be 86 when he runs for a 25th term.last_img read more

first_img Road Trip 2019 In 1995, I visited the Russian nuclear weapons city of Sarov. Here, I’m showing a copy of the newspaper where I worked at the time, the Los Alamos Monitor, to physicist Viktor Adamsky, who helped design the Tsar Bomba — the most powerful nuclear weapon ever exploded. Stephen Shankland/CNET Military I spent more than five years as a reporter in Los Alamos, New Mexico, birthplace of the atomic bomb, home to a major national laboratory, and the 18,000-person town where I grew up. I covered everything from President Bill Clinton visiting the lab to mostly harmless radioactive cat poop triggering radiation alarms at the county landfill. But the story that made the biggest impression on me took place thousands of miles away, in Russia.In May 1995, I was part of a seven-person civilian delegation that traveled to Los Alamos sister city Sarov, about 230 miles east of Moscow. It’s the home of the institute where Russia developed its first atomic bomb. Our visit was timed to coincide with a 50th anniversary celebration of the end of the Great Patriotic War, aka World War II, which for the Russians ended when the Germans capitulated in May 1945.It was a sobering visit — the economic devastation; the Soviet-era microphones bugging away in our hotel; the angry and impoverished veterans; and the daunting quantities of vodka, champagne and cognac that accompanied us during a weeklong series of banquets. I spoke with Viktor Adamsky, one of the designers of the biggest nuclear bomb of all time, the 50-megaton Tsar Bomba, which was more powerful than all the bombs dropped in World War II.I’m remembering it now because I’ve recently interviewed Siegfried Hecker, former director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and a key leader of the US-Russian lab collaboration that led to my trip. Back when US-Russian relations were thawingDuring the time of my trip, relations between Russia and the US were warming, but now they’re cooling once again. That troubles Hecker — even though he spent much of his career designing the nuclear weapons the US aimed at the then-USSR.It troubles me, as well. I grew up during the Cold War, and I’m not eager to introduce my children to concepts like nuclear winter and megadeath. And even as treaties between the US and Russia fizzle out and the two countries rev up another arms race, worries are piling up about the nuclear weapons capabilities of Iran and North Korea, too.But Hecker stresses the similarities between the US and Russia — “They’re so much like us,” he says — and what was most interesting on my 1995 trip was the cultural connection between Los Alamos and Sarov. There was a clear kinship between the cities’ researchers — a curious camaraderie given that those very researchers designed the warheads perched atop ICBMs aimed at each other.A Russian in the nuclear weapons design city of Sarov in 1995 gave me this medal -- the Order of the Badge of Honor -- as a token of goodwill after the Cold War ended. The Soviet Union awarded the medal for achievements in labor, culture and science.A Russian in the nuclear weapons design city of Sarov in 1995 gave me this medal — the Order of the Badge of Honor — as a token of goodwill after the Cold War ended. The Soviet Union awarded the medal for achievements in labor, culture and science. Stephen Shankland/CNET Each city benefited from its government’s largesse during the Cold War. “When I first came here, I thought it was a paradise. Such food!” one Sarov man told me. Meanwhile, Los Alamos received a federal funding boost for its schools and its police and fire departments. Each city suffered when government funding dropped with the end of the Cold War. Both cities teem with elite researchers who play important military roles and are curious about what makes the universe tick. Both cities have nuclear weapons museums showing off the hulking casings of early bombs.Even the names of the cities had a parallel. When I visited, Sarov still went by its Cold War name of Arzamas-16 — a bit of geographic misdirection to make it look like it was part of a nothing-special city that actually is 30 miles northeast. During World War II, mail for Manhattan Project researchers in Los Alamos was addressed to P.O. Box 1663 in Santa Fe, about the same distance away from Los Alamos as Arzamas is from Sarov.Lab-to-lab collaborationMy trip was an outgrowth of the US-Russia nuclear collaboration undertaken by Hecker and his colleagues after the collapse of the Soviet Union. The effort, funded by the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program, saw US and Russian scientists working on joint research and helping to get a grip on the vast quantities of Soviet-era nuclear weapons materials.I understood the political appeal of the program. For would-be terrorists or countries aspiring to join the nuclear weapons club, the hardest step is obtaining potent plutonium or weapons-grade uranium. Paying Russians to better control those materials — and to discourage scientists from looking for new jobs elsewhere — made sense for US foreign policy.Russian nuclear bomb museum in SarovSarov, called Arzamas-16 during the Cold War, is home to a museum showing several historic Russian nuclear bombs. I’m second from left. Stephen Shankland/CNET But seeing Sarov firsthand showed me the human side of the program’s benefits.After the economic crisis that accompanied the demise of the USSR, Sarov residents had to grow potatoes in their window flower boxes and turn their countryside dachas into small farms. A typical scientist’s salary at the time was about $80 per month, as the ruble collapsed in value. Hardest hit by the end of the Cold War were elderly World War II veterans thrust back onto the job market after their pensions became worthless. The security fence around Sarov came to be enjoyed as a way to keep away the outsiders who’d had it even worse.Like Hecker, I visited Russians in their homes. After attending the World War II memorial around which our visit centered, I slipped off with some journalists from Sarov’s City Courier newspaper. They introduced me to their children, spoke of using surreptitious “samizdat” publications to disseminate information in the Soviet years, taught me how to spell my name in Cyrillic (Стѳфѳн Шѳнкланд), and told me how they cobbled together rafts for weeks-long descents of Siberian rivers. One gave me a present symbolic of US-Russian cooperation: a massive hand-cranked drill, made in Massachusetts but given to Russians in World War II and used during the German siege of Leningrad.In short, they showed me they were human.Personal connectionsI feel a more personal connection to Russia myself, too. In 1995, I met Boris Nemtsov, a reform-minded politician who then led the nearby Nizhny Novgorod (named Gorky in the Soviet era) region and earned a Ph.D. in physics. Among his policies was a “meter by meter” privatization push that let people gradually buy their apartments from the state. The discussion felt a lot more forward-looking than seeing Lenin’s waxy corpse in Moscow’s Red Square.Sarov's City Courier newspaper from 1995 chronicles the visit of Stephen Shankland (center photo, holding newspaper) and others from Los Alamos, New Mexico, to the Russian nuclear weapons design city.Enlarge ImageSarov’s City Courier newspaper from 1995 chronicled the visit I and others from Los Alamos, New Mexico, paid to the Russian nuclear weapons design city. I’m in the center photo, showing the newspaper to some students. Stephen Shankland/CNET Nemtsov rose to become a national reform leader, willing to speak out against President Vladimir Putin. But in 2015, Nemtsov was assassinated on a bridge in Moscow. I felt it more closely than an “ordinary” episode of political violence.And I felt the same tie when five Sarov scientists were killed in a Russian missile test explosion this month.Hecker has a lot more of those connections. He’s friends with plenty of Russians and sees their cultural values as very similar to ours. And he’s keeping his communication links alive even though the US-Russia lab-to-lab collaboration project he helped begin is now all but dead. He’ll take his 57th trip to Russia in November.The two countries can move past sticking points like NATO’s eastward expansion and Russia’s military action in the Crimea and eastern Ukraine, Hecker says. Today’s nationalistic fervor might make it hard to defrost the relationship, but seeing the world from the other side’s perspective will help, he says.”There is absolutely no need for Russia and the US to be adversaries and enemies,” Hecker tells me. “Absolutely none.” 5 Sci-Techcenter_img Tags This story is part of Road Trip 2019, profiles of the troublemakers and trailblazers who are designing our future. Share your voice Commentslast_img read more

first_imgKolaiyuthir Kaalam, Khamoshi and Game OverCollage of photos taken from Twitter and FacebookActress Taapsee Pannu are gearing up to lock horns with Nayanthara (Nayantara) as their movies Game Over and Kolaiyuthir Kaalam will clash with each other at the box office.Nayanthara and Taapsee Pannu are two most popular actresses from south. Both of them will be seen playing lead roles in female centric films like Kolaiyuthir Kaalam and Game Over. Surprisingly, both the movies are released on July 14 and there will be a big clash among them at the box office. They are likely to eat away each other’s shares.Game Over is a suspense thriller, which is written and directed by Ashwin Saravanan. This is also a bilingual film made and released in Telugu and Tamil with the same title. Taapsee Pannu is playing the female lead in the film, which is produced jointly by Y NOT Studios and Reliance Entertainment.On the other hand, Kolaiyuthir Kaalam is a also mystery thriller film, which is directed by Chakri Toleti. The movie revolves around the story of a young woman with a speech disability, who finds herself stranded in a mansion haunted by a series of gruesome killings. She witnesses murderer lurking in the shadows. How she saves herself from becoming a victim forms the crux of the film.Nayanthara has played speech-impaired woman in Kolaiyuthir Kaalam and it promos have grabbed many eyeballs. When compared to two other movies, this film has bigger response and viewership on the social media. Nayan has proved herself to be the lady superstar with back-to-back success of his women-oriented movies released in recent years. It is likely to lead the race at the box office.last_img read more

first_imgBy Renee Foose, Special to the AFROMost people would agree that being born into homelessness is not a good situation. Few, if any, would consider such a circumstance to be a blessing. However, one Baltimore native falls into the category of feeling blessed to have been born homeless to a single mom who struggled from alcoholism.  Richard Antoine White  has used his early life experiences to shape his journey from being cold, barefoot, hungry and alone in the Sandtown-Winchester community in West Baltimore to healthy, happy, educated, and playing symphony music on a world stage.Richard Antoine White (Courtesy Photo)Born to a single mom who battled addiction, White was often left alone to fend for himself as he wandered the streets looking for his mother. When searching for her, he’d also scan storm drains and sidewalks looking for spare change. “Eventually when I had a dollar, I would go buy chicken gizzards so I could eat,” White told the AFRO.  “I would keep gizzard meat under my tongue all day, to help with hunger.”White recalls sleeping under trees, and on park benches as a child not having reached school age. “There is a problem when everyone sees a child running around without shoes and sleeping in a park,” White said. He also has scars on his torso from being bitten by rats while sleeping, he said.After police found him sleeping on a very cold morning he was placed in foster care. His new foster parents were the same foster parents that raised his mother. and they were eager to adopt him. “He didn’t have much trouble adjusting, my children and the other children we had, helped him quite a bit,” said foster parent Richard McClain, Sr.   McClain, who is active in his church choir, doesn’t play an instrument but supported White’s desire to learn how to play music.  “We put him in school and he wanted to play music, so I got him a trumpet,” said McClain.Richard Antoine White (Courtesy Photo)Eventually a music teacher believed White had strong lungs and natural strength, so he was given a sousaphone, a lighter version of a tuba. White didn’t read music well, so he listened to cassette tapes of tuba players and practiced until he could mimic the sound.  “I played for fun with no real interest in being a musician,” White said. “I wanted to play football until I broke my hip in a street game, then I became more serious about playing music,” he said.When it came time to enter high school, White took his basic music skills and a borrowed sousaphone to audition for a seat at the Baltimore School for the Performing Arts. Unfortunately, he missed the audition date, and showed up to an empty school. Luckily for White, he was greeted by Chris Ford, the head of the music department.“He was an intriguing sight, a kid on crutches carrying a plastic sousaphone,” Ford told the AFRO.  Ford, now the director of Baltimore School for the Arts, said he chose to give White a chance to audition because he sensed White’s determination.  “He couldn’t sight read music, and his ability to sing back pitches was weak; but he had a way of manipulating sound in a meaningful way,” Ford said.  White was granted admission to the school and began playing the tuba.As he planned to further his musical talents, he worked as an usher at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. During concerts, White paid close attention to the principal tubist, David Fedderly.  “During performances, most ushers congregate in lobby areas; Richard didn’t do that. He’d stay and listen to the music and after the performance he would find me and ask questions,” Fedderly said.  “I knew he wanted to learn tuba and I knew he wanted to gain admission into a good college program to become a good musician,” Fedderly said. Fedderly, who also taught music, became White’s teacher at The Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University, where he worked closely with White to master the tuba. Upon earning his bachelor’s degree, White enrolled at Indiana University to pursue graduate studies. After just a few years, White earned a doctorate in tuba performance and became the first African American at Indiana University to do so.   The American Federation of Musicians report that African Americans make up less than four percent of symphony musicians world-wide, and White became one of the elites after accepting a one-year position with the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra (NMSO) in Albuquerque. New Mexico became his new home and he earned tenure with the orchestra, in addition to teaching at the University of New Mexico.In 2011, NMSO filed for bankruptcy and White was out of a job. The survival instincts he learned as a homeless child kicked in, and White did something few would consider. He met with university athletic staff and proposed a scenario to help the marching band with breathing techniques and choreography. “He saw an opportunity and presented a way how he could help the university,” said Chad Simons, associate professor and director of marching bands University of New Mexico.  White’s pitch worked, and he was hired as the assistant marching band director. “His motivation and positive message are powerful for nineteen-year-olds to hear,” said Simons.White is now a tenured faculty member at the University of New Mexico.  After the collapse of the NMSO, White was one of several musicians to form the New Mexico Philharmonic, where he is the principal tubist.His personal journey through destitution to doctoral studies only became widely known after two Baltimore-based filmmakers contacted Ford with an interest in creating a documentary about arts education being underfunded.  Darren Durlach and David Larson are the founders of Early Light Media. Their inspiring and award-winning films capture the human element in a way that compels viewers to be open to new perspectives.  When Ford suggested the filmmakers contact White, they were unaware of all the nuances of his journey, but quickly saw a powerful message.  “Our challenge in making the film was finding a way to tell the story in an authentic way,” said Durlach. “The story is one of persistence, and how a teacher can make all the difference in someone’s life,” he said.Durlach and Larson documented White’s journey and compelling message of hope, help and hard work. The film, RAW (White’s initials) Tuba is a contender for several independent film festival awards around the nation.White considers his journey a blessing and wants his message to inspire others to find hope, commit to a work ethic, and never give up.  To hear music performed by White, visit his web page at RawTuba.com.last_img read more

first_img Live Results Story Links LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Five student-athletes from the University of Louisville track and field team will travel to Austin, Texas to compete in the NCAA Championships at Mike. A Myers Stadium . Representatives from 142 different schools will participate in women’s events, while 126 programs are represented on the men’s side.The championship begins Wednesday, June 5 with 21 events (10 prelims, 11 finals). The opening event, the 100-meter men’s finals kicks off at 3:30 p.m. ET.  All three days of championships will be available to live stream on ESPN, ESPNU or ESPN3. Find the full broadcast schedule below.Albert Kosgei will compete first for the Cardinals on Wednesday in the 3,000m steeplechase semifinals at 5:02 p.m. He carries a season best time of 8:38.90 set at the NCAA East Preliminary Round into the championships.Martice Moore will follow at 6:30 p.m. in the semifinals of the 400m hurdles. In his two runs at the NCAA East Preliminary Round, he set the school record both times with marks of 50.73 and 49.85.Makenli Forrest will compete in her first of two events on Thursday. She will compete in hammer throw at 4:30 p.m. Forrest’s season best throw of 63.08m/206-11 came at the Louisville Invitational in April. She finished with a throw of 62.12m/203-10 at the NCAA East Preliminary Round to punch her ticket to nationals.Gabriela Leon will compete in pole vault at 7:30 p.m. Earlier this season, she broke the school record clearing of 4.27m/14-00. She cleared 4.17m/13-8.25 in Jacksonville, Fla. advancing to her second straight nationals appearance.Ivine Chemutai will be the sole track runner for Louisville on Thursday, running the 10,000m at 9:38 p.m. Chemutai set a new personal best at the NCAA East Preliminary Round, crossing the finish line in 33:54.84.Forrest will throw in the discus at 5:05 p.m. on Saturday to wrap up the championship meet. She opened the outdoor season by setting a new personal best with a mark of 55.76m/182-11. She threw for 53.98m/177-1.0 at the NCAA East Preliminary Round to punch her second ticket of the championships. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

first_imgIt’s only in a work of art can you expect life being breathed into the dying. Shovan Gandhi, a Delhi based photographer, in his work Alang has done just the same.  Being a part of the bigger picture – Pix – a photo quarterly, Gandhi has portrayed Habitat through this endeavor along with fifteen other artists. Alang is a journey of ships, starting from the day they are born to the waves they crash and land to their graveyard and even beyond. It tries to encapsulate the experiences the ships go through throughout their life and finally end up in this ship breaking centre in Gujarat. He compares, not the life of a ship to that of a man, but vice-versa. One cannot ignore the idea glaring through his pictures that each man-made thing has to come to an end. Once worn out, nothing can keep the drums rolling, or here, the ships sailing. Though ‘philosophical’, it asks the question of death and birth; of waste from value and conversely.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Alang also portrays the journey, its end and a new beginning. The lines by T. S. Eliot, ‘What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from,’ fits Alang beautifully. It shows not only how the once mighty ships sailing the economies of the world come to rest in peace, but also how their end marks a new beginning for scrap collectors. For truly, there never is an end.  The project has attracted various view points from various fields of ecology, architecture and finance. Not being faced with a criticism yet, Shovan has tried to highlight the prevailing socio-cultural ecosystem in which, according to him, ‘unimportant men can aggregate and die so that dead ships live.’ Drawing influence from architecture and fine art, Gandhi wishes there would be more platforms in the country for display of photographs and art. He expects to present a new project in the following year.WHERE: Goethe-Institute, Maxmuller Bhawan, New DelhiWHEN: When: 9 to 16 May, 7:00 pm to 9:30 pmlast_img read more

first_imgKolkata: Minister of state (independent charge) for Women & Child Development & Social Welfare Shashi Panja on Tuesday said the government is setting up six new adoption centres in the state.The state presently has 24 adoption centres covering all the districts in the state that are managed by non-governmental organisations. However, the entire funding for functioning of these centres are borne by the state government.”The six new centres will come up in Paschim Medinipur, Alipurduar, Hooghly, Howrah, Jalpaiguri and Purulia. It will be directly managed and financed by the government,” said Panja. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe minister on Tuesday inaugurated a new adoption centre at Manikpara in Jhargram. “This adoption centre meets all the criteria of The Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015,” Panja said. The Jhargram adoption centre has 10 children.The minister will hold district level meeting on review of Adoption and ICDS matters in the district on Wednesday with all the concerned officials. The various schemes like Kanyashree, Rupasree and Manobik will be reviewed by the minister.The adoption centres in the state take care of a child up to an age of six and during this period it ensures that it is handed over to a couple who wants to adopt the child.last_img read more

first_imgBarcelona bans new hotels in the city centre to curb property prices MADRID — Despite fierce opposition from hotel and business owners, Barcelona officials agreed Friday to curb the number of rooms for tourists in the city centre in a move aimed at appeasing residents angry about sky-high property prices.The City Council approved the proposal from Barcelona Mayor Ada Colau, a former activist who made herself a name campaigning against evictions ordered by banks when tenants failed to repay mortgages.Soon after she took office in 2015, Colau imposed a moratorium on new licenses for hotels, serviced apartments and other establishments offering tourist accommodations.The new plan grants a limited number of licenses in the outskirts of the city, but no new permits are expected downtown even if current businesses close down.“We have to stop this free-flow that operates without any control in the city,” Janet Sanz, a deputy mayor in charge of urban planning and a close aide of Colau’s, said.Hotel and retail business groups issued a joint statement on Friday criticizing what they consider to be the latest move by the mayor to “demonize” tourism. The industry says tourism accounts for 14 per cent of Barcelona’s GDP and employs over 100,000 people.More news:  Save the dates! Goway’s Africa Roadshow is backNuria Paricio, director of Barcelona Oberta, an association of more than 6,700 shops and businesses, said tourism was being turned into “a scourge.”“This plan is not going to stop the illegal apartments that are appearing like mushrooms in Airbnb and other platforms and that are responsible for pushing the prices of rentals in apartments,” Paricio said.Colau government has initiated legal battles against online platforms that allow homeowners to rent out their properties without paying occupancy taxes. It also has pledged to increase the number of inspectors combing the city for unlicensed apartments from 20 to 110 in 2018.Barcelona, with 1.6 million permanent residents, received 32 million visitors in 2016, according to local authorities, although more than half of them only made day trips while staying in nearby coastal towns or on cruise ships. Tags: Spain Share By: Aritz Parra Source: The Associated Press Monday, January 30, 2017 << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

first_img Travelweek Group Tags: Agent Incentives, Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts, Savings Share Bahia Principe’s Happiness Sale includes newly reno’d Luxury Bahia Principe Ambar Posted bycenter_img Tuesday, January 8, 2019 MIAMI — Bahia Principe Hotels & Resorts is starting the new year off right with the return of one of its most popular consumer incentives, aimed at ramping up bookings just as the winter weather here at home settles in for the long haul.Today marks the start of Bahia Principe’s Happiness Sale, taking place now through Jan. 22 and offering savings on travel throughout 2019, including peak season and holidays.Clients can pick from 20 of Bahia Principe’s all-inclusive properties located in the D.R., Jamaica and Mexico.Vacationers can also reserve a stay at Luxury Bahia Principe Ambar, which reopened late last year after an extensive renovation, or at Grand Bahia Principe Aquamarine, an adults-only, Punta Cana property which has been rebranded.“As 2019 begins to unfold, potential travellers are looking ahead and planning for their next special getaway,” says Helen Montijano, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for the U.S. and Canada. “Our signature Happiness Sale allows for travellers to book in advance, taking advantage of notable discounts for travel throughout 2019 including deep summer deals. Our resorts offer top service, facilities and amenities that create a wonderful experience in the Caribbean for everyone, including snowbirds or those who simply want a quick weekend escape.”Grand Bahia Principe La RomanaThe booking deadline is Jan. 22 and the travel deadline is Oct. 31, including peak season. Bahia Principe says the extended travel window gives vacationers the ability to book far in advance at an attainable price point.More news:  Air Canada’s global sales update includes Managing Director, Canada & USA SalesPunta Cana’s Luxury Bahia Principe Ambar, which reopened in November 2018 after US$30 million in renovations, has been upgraded to feature all-new swim up suites and modern interiors. Travellers can also reserve a stay at the rebranded Grand Bahia Principe Aquamarine, an adults-only, entertainment-focused property. For families looking for a whimsical setting and a range of activities for guests of all ages, there’s Fantasia Bahia Principe Punta Cana.Bahia Principe reminds agents that they can take advantage of double points for all bookings through the brand’s Bahia Principe Rewards loyalty program.Agents who are new to Bahia Principe Rewards receive 1,000 welcome points when they sign up, which are also doubled during the Happiness Sale booking window.For more information see www.bahia-principe.com << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more

first_img Durkan: Stormont Stalemate is a wilful neglect of children’s healthFOYLE MLAHEALTH SPOKESPERSONMark H DurkanRoyal College of Paediatrics and Child Health IrelandSDLP “It is unconscionable that politics here has allowed for a society where children’s mental health is in decline and over a quarter suffer from obesity and other health related issues.“Two years without an Executive marks two years of wilful neglect; vital recommendations and updated models for children’s healthcare have not been implemented. “Just last year hundreds of babies in the North West did not receive their early year assessments due do a shortage of health visitors.“It is clear that children here are being disadvantaged from birth as a result of systemic failures. ShareTweet “Our children are being let down in education, future employment opportunities and now the most basic of necessities; reliable healthcare. These are issues we cannot afford to be left behind on.”He added: “We must not allow children’s health and well-being to be treated as collateral damage amidst the playground politics of the DUP and Sinn Fein. “Evidently their political self-interests override the best interests of a public they supposedly represent.“We cannot be lulled into inaction on these matters. “The prosperous future of our society is reliant on the good health of our children- invest in them and we invest in a brighter Northern Ireland. “Now is the time to put the needs of the people ahead of politics, before the deterioration of our institutions reaches the point of no return. ”Durkan: Stormont Stalemate is a wilful neglect of children’s health was last modified: January 24th, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: SDLP Health Spokesperson Mark H Durkan has said the continued Stormont stalemate a ‘wilful neglect of children’s health.’ His comments follow a report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health Ireland which revealed ‘no progress’ on child health policy in the North has put children’s health at risk.Said the Foyle MLA: “Living within a political vacuum, it is unsurprising that there has been no progress insofar as children’s health policy is concerned.last_img read more