first_img6 November 2013South African scientists are to lead two of the 10 teams involved in the design of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope, the international SKA Organisation announced on Monday.The SKA’s global partners have committed €120-million to the three-year design phase, which will involve more than 350 scientists representing 18 nations and drawn from nearly 100 institutions.The SKA project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, to be co-located in South Africa and Australia.SKA South Africa said in a statement on Monday that the telescope’s design had been broken down into various modules called “work packages”. Each of these packages, of which SKA South Africa has been selected to lead two, will be managed by a team of international experts.Dr Richard Lord, of SKA South Africa, will head up the team that deals with the “assembly, integration and verification” element, which involves the planning of activities at the sites needed to incorporate the SKA into existing infrastructure.Tracy Cheetham, also of SKA South Africa, will head up the team charged with all the infrastructure-related work for the telescope.In addition, various South African companies and universities are playing key roles in the design of numerous elements of the other work packages, including dishes, telescope manager, science data processors, central signal processors and signal and data transport.SKA SA general manager for science computing and innovation, Jasper Horrell, told Business Day that seven South African companies and two local universities were involved in the design work at this stage.Professor John Womersley, chairman of the SKA board, said in a statement: “This multi-disciplinary team of experts has three full years to come up with the best technological solutions for the final design of the telescope, so we can start tendering for construction of the first phase in 2017 as planned.”Deploying thousands of radio telescopes, in three unique configurations, the SKA will enable astronomers to monitor the sky in unprecedented detail and survey the entire sky thousands of times faster than any system currently in existence. It will be able to detect very faint radio signals emitted shortly after the Big Bang.The international SKA organisation has 10 member countries: Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, the Netherlands and the UK. India is an associate member.SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

first_imgOdisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik on Monday announced a series of awards and special incentives for dedicated doctors, paramedical staff and other healthcare workers of government hospitals across the State.Stating that his government was emphasising on quality healthcare under its 5T (transparency, teamwork, technology, time and transformation) initiative, Mr. Patnaik said that 10 doctors and other healthcare workers will be presented with Chief Minister Award, which includes cash prizes of ₹10 lakh and ₹5 lakh respectively. Government healthcare institutions providing quality service will also be rewarded, he added.last_img read more

first_imgIf numbers are anything to go by, the 20th edition of the Delhi Book Fair is witnessing a dramatic comeback of the iconic Indian comic character, Chacha Chaudhary, whose creator Pran Kumar Sharma died recently. Our stall has seen an unprecedented footfall over the last few days and we have already sold more than three thousand copies of the Chacha Chaudhary series, Gulshan Rai, publisher, Diamond Comics, told PTI.In what could be called a fitting tribute, Diamond Comics has also republished all the early editions of the series and released them at their original price, effectively leading to a huge discount.People visiting the fair could be seen lapping up the opportunity to purchase these comic books, with the Diamond Comics stall swarming with buyers cutting across the age spectrum, giving credence to the publisher’s claim. “I remember fighting with my siblings over who would read the comic first. Such was the craze that even during exams, I used to keep those comics underneath my textbooks, all the while pretending that I was studying,” said Rachita Arora, a homemaker, taking a trip down memory lane at the Fair. The Chacha Chaudhary comic is available in 10 languages.”The diminutive ‘Chacha’, with a brain sharper than a needle and faster than a super-computer, once had a ubiquitous presence in many Indian homes. But like other indigenous comic characters, ‘Chacha’ too faded away from public memory owing to multiple distractions,” Rachita added.Shivani Gupta, an avowed fan of the endearing character, said, My son remains glued to the television watching shows like ‘Chhota Bheem’ when he is not busy fiddling with an app or the other on the phone. I am buying a few copies of Chacha Chaudhury, just to inculcate the habit of reading in him.advertisementMeanwhile, Chacha Chaudhary fans might be able to possess some collectors’ items through a deal announced by the online shopping site Groupon India. The site in collaboration with Diamond Comics has launched a series of deals, which offer limited edition copies of the comics bearing digital autographs of Pran.The package contains other Chacha merchandise like DVDs, 3D comics and magnet stickers. Four deals available with the site including The Best of Chacha Chaudhury (English) a handpicked collection of five popular issues of the comics priced at Rs 333.Buyers would also receive a DVD worth Rs 150, a Chacha Chaudhary magnet sticker, and a 3D comic worth Rs 50 on purchase of the deal. Pran imagined Chacha a middle class frail but highly intelligent old man. He always sported a bushy bristling white mustache and a trademark red pagadi.A wooden stick, a pocket watch and a waistcoat with a double inside pocket are also some of Chacha’s wardrobe staples. Wife Bini (Chachi), a faithful street dog Rocket and a giant called Sabu who is his sidekick are what Pran gave Chacha as his household members.The Chacha Chaudhary comic is available in 10 languages.last_img read more

first_imgHardik Pandya starred with both bat and ball on the second day of the first Test against South Africa at Newlands, Cape Town on Saturday.After scoring a counter-attacking 93 off 95, Pandya got rid of the South African openers as the hosts reached 65/2 at the close of play to take a substantial lead of 142 runs.Hashim Amla (four not out) and night-watchman Kagiso Rabada (two not out) will seek on day three to extend the home side’s advantage of 142 runs with eight second innings wickets remaining after they bowled India out for 209 on a lively wicket offering plenty of assistance for the bowlers.South Africa, however, were sweating over another potential injury blow for experienced seamer Dale Steyn.Steyn (2-51) left the field during the innings having bowled 17.3 overs and went for scans on a bruised heel. He was later seen limping as he came back to the ground and his participation in the rest of the match — and the series — is in doubt.Steyn returned to Test cricket for the match after 14 months on the sidelines with a career-threatening shoulder injury.ALSO WATCHSouth Africa’s Aiden Markram (34) was the first wicket to fall in their second innings, having looked fluent at the crease until he top-edged a rising delivery from Hardik Pandya (2-17) to Bhuvneshwar Kumar at a deep point.Dean Elgar (25) was scratchy throughout his stay at the crease and became Pandya’s second victim when he edged to wicketkeeper Wriddhiman Saha.Earlier, Pandya defied the odds to smash runs all over the park on a pitch where top Indian batsmen struggled to score runs. Pandya struck a 93 off just 95 balls on the second day an innings studded with 14 fours and a six. His valiant effort helped India score 209 in reply to South Africa’s 286, who took a crucial 77-run first innings lead.advertisementPandya came out all guns blazing and played his own game attacking the South Africa pace battery, which had ripped apart the Indian batting line-up and left the visitors reeling at 76/5.Pandya had joined Ravchandran Ashwin first ball after lunch when overnight batsman Cheteshwar Pujara was caught for 26 by skipper Faf du Plessis off Vernon Philander. Ashwin (12) and Wriddhiman Saha (0) soon departed and India were in deep trouble at 92/7 before Pandya took the attack back to the opposition.Pandya started off on an attacking mode and was not afraid to take the risks. Like fortune favours the brave, the 24-year-old survived twice. Dean Elgar dropped him on 15 off Dale Steyn and Quinton de Kock missed a stumping chance when Pandya was batting on 71.In the 56th over, Pandya had welcomed spinner Keshav Maharaj with a mighty six on the second ball of the over.On the very next ball, he stepped down the track again and swung his bat wildly only to miss the ball. The awkward bounce was generated after pitching and De Kock fumbled collecting the ball chest high.Pandya was also involved in a 99-run stand  Bhuvneshwar for the eighth wicket to help the visitors cut down the first innings deficit.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more

first_imgzoom Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri and cruise ship owner Viking Ocean Cruises have entered into an agreement for the construction of six further ocean ships.Under the agreement, which is subject to specific conditions, the new vessels would be handed over to their owner in 2024, 2025, 2026 and 2027.Fincantieri informed that the parties would develop an advanced project based on the characteristics of the previous ships, updated and revisited in line with the latest technologies available on the market.The deal, signed during the Seatrade Cruise Global event in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, would lead to a total number of 16 units built in cooperation between the two companies, expanding the horizon of the partnership until 2027.Viking’s current ocean fleet includes ships having a gross tonnage of about 47,800 tons with accommodation for 930 passengers in 465 cabins.As of today, Fincantieri has delivered 4 ships to Viking Ocean Cruises. The first of the series, Viking Star, has been built at the shipyard in Marghera and delivered in March 2015, while the second, the third and the fourth, Viking Sea, Viking Sky and Viking Sun, took the sea from the Ancona shipyard respectively in March 2016, January and September 2017.The further six units in the order book will be delivered respectively in 2018, 2019, 2021, 2022 (2 units) and 2023.Giuseppe Bono, CEO of Fincantieri, said that the agreement “confirms the extraordinary moment of the demand in this sector. This allows Fincantieri to consolidate its worldwide leadership, laying the groundwork to enhance the order book with a workload ensuring today work safety for the next 10 years.”last_img read more

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Flickr/Janko Hoener / CC-BY-SA-4.0. Luxembourg-based transportation company CLdN RoRo has canceled a contract with Croatian shipbuilder Uljanik for the construction of one roll-on/roll-off (RoRo) vessel.The contract covering one 5,500 lane meter ship (hull no. 531) was terminated on January 27, 2019, according to a filing issued on the Zagreb Stock Exchange.As explained, the contract was canceled due to Uljanik’s inability to deliver the newbuilding in line with the conditions stipulated in the agreement.Back in 2016, CLdN RoRo ordered two identical RoRo ships, originally scheduled for delivery in 2018.Designed for transporting wheeled cargoes, such as trucks, cars and semi-trailer trucks, the ships were part of the company’s expansion program including up to twelve new vessels.Following the cancellation of the RoRo ship, Uljanik received another termination of the shipbuilding contract today. The contract for one self-propelled cutter suction dredger was terminated by Dredging and Maritime Management SA (DMM) Luxembourg.The financially-troubled Uljanik is being hit with contact terminations amid the ongoing restructuring process. The shipbuilding group, which comprises the 3. Maj shipyard in Rijeka and the Uljanik shipyard in Pula, is seeking one or more strategic partners that would inject fresh funds into the company, helping it stay afloat.In a separate announcement published today, Uljanik confirmed the receipt of a number of bids from potential investors. The group’s management and other relevant parties are expected to evaluate these offers in the coming period.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

first_imgThe People Concern, a nonprofit organization leading the effort to end homelessness in Los Angeles, announced today its first-ever gala event, “Celebrating Change,” will take place Sunday, April 29 at Casa Vertigo in downtown Los Angeles.The gala celebrates more than 55 years of life-saving work, and funds raised will go directly toward helping homeless individuals by providing much needed services including mental health care, housing services, domestic violence services, life skills, income assistance, medical care and outreach.Celebrity supporters of The People Concern who may be in attendance include David Arquette, Greg Germann, Marcia Cross, Seth Green, Kymberly Marciano-Strauss and Annabeth Gish. The gala will include a cocktail and hors d’oeuvres reception beginning at 5pm, followed by a three-course sit down dinner at 6:30pm, a special appeal hosted by KTLA’s Sam Rubin and live entertainment to follow. The attire for the evening is semi-formal and a hosted valet will be provided.During the event, The People Concern Executive Director John Maceri will honor Steaven K. Jones, a passionate board member and longtime supporter of the organization for more than two decades. Maceri will also make a special presentation honoring the memory of William Keck, Jr. and the tremendous impact he has made for the Los Angeles community and The People Concern.“The rate of homelessness in Los Angeles County is at an all-time high, totaling nearly 58,000,” said Maceri, who has been connected to the cause for nearly 20 years. “The People Concern empowers the most vulnerable among us and continues to be a leading advocate of the “Housing First” model, placing program participants in stable housing followed by comprehensive, integrated services necessary to sustain housing. As a result, 95 percent of those housed by The People Concern remained housed forever. This gala will raise much-needed funds to further our mission that everyone should be housed, healthy and safe.”For more information or to purchase tickets, click here. For information about event sponsorships email events@thepeopleconcern.org.last_img read more

“If Mike Trout walked into your neighborhood bar, would you recognize him?” The New Yorker’s Ben McGrath raised that question in a provocative essay last month.I’m reasonably certain that I would recognize the MLB outfielder if he walked into One Star. But McGrath’s point is well-taken. Despite being (as McGrath aptly calls him) a “once-in-a-generation talent,” Trout is relatively anonymous. Based on Google search traffic so far in 2014, Trout is only about as famous as Henrik Lundqvist, the New York Rangers goaltender. He’s one-fifth as famous as Peyton Manning — and one-twentieth as famous as LeBron James or Lionel Messi.Trout’s also much less famous than Derek Jeter, a shortstop who hit .256, with four home runs, this year.That Jeter fellow, as you may have heard, played his last baseball games Sunday. Jeter’s case for being a once-in-a-generation talent is weaker than Trout’s. Jeter never won an MVP (although he probably should have won one in 1999). He rarely led his league in any offensive category. He was one of the best baseball players for a very long time — but he was not clearly the best player at any given time. In that respect, he’s more similar to Pete Rose or Nolan Ryan or Warren Moon or Patrick Ewing or Nicklas Lidstrom — great players all — than generational talents like Peyton Manning or LeBron James or Willie Mays or Ted Williams.Jeter, however, was probably the most famous baseball player of his generation.Google Trends maintains data on Google search traffic since 2004, a period that captures the second half of Jeter’s career. Google searches aren’t a perfect proxy for popularity — as you’ll see, infamy can also get you a lot of Google traffic — but they’re a reasonably objective approximation of it.I looked up the search traffic for Jeter, along with that for every other baseball player to post at least 30 wins above replacement (WAR) from 2004 through 2014. (Jeter’s WAR, controversially, was only 31.4 during this period; about 50 players rated ahead of him.) I also included every MLB MVP winner since 2004 — along with Trout, who might finally win an MVP this year. The chart below lists everyone else’s search traffic relative to Jeter’s.Jeter leads in Google traffic. The only players within 50 percent of him are Alex Rodriguez, Barry Bonds and Ichiro Suzuki.Rodriguez and Bonds, of course, have made news in recent years, mostly for their use of performance-enhancing drugs. Suzuki is a better comparison, but most of his search traffic is because of his extraordinary popularity in Japan. In the United States, Jeter generated five or six times as much Google interest as Suzuki did.Otherwise, Jeter laps the field. Based on the Google numbers, he’s been about nine times as famous as his Yankee contemporary Mariano Rivera. He’s been about five times as famous as David Ortiz, another legendarily “clutch” performer. He’s been about 30 times as famous as Jimmy Rollins, a fellow East Coast shortstop and one who did win an MVP award.Jeter’s also considerably more famous than today’s best-in-a-generation players. Even in 2013 — when he was hurt and played in only 17 games — Jeter was about as popular as Trout, Clayton Kershaw and Andrew McCutchen combined, at least according to Google.Playing in New York almost certainly had something to do with this. Lots of Yankees and Mets rank high on the Google list. Robinson Cano, the former Yankee, has gotten twice as much search traffic as the Philadelphia Phillies’ Chase Utley though the two are highly similar statistically.But I hope that Trout, Kershaw, McCutchen or Bryce Harper does something extraordinary this postseason and begins to build a legend of his own. It’s not healthy for a sport when its most popular player is 40 years old. read more

first_img For us, that’s a challenge. If The New York Times Magazine is putting Nicki Minaj on its cover or T Magazine is putting Rihanna on its cover during the same cycle as us, we want to make sure that the way we’re covering that story is innovative, unique and high quality. For us, having Rihanna on our cover at the same time as Vanity Fair and T Magazine, I feel like our story really held up. That’s what this year has been about for us, challenging ourselves not to just be a good music magazine or a good looking magazine, but to be one of the best culture magazines out there.  Folio: There was a time when a huge, global pop star like Rihanna might have only wanted to appear on the cover of Vanity Fair, for example, and it seems that’s no longer the case. Is that reflective of a changing landscape in magazine media? Folio: Going back to the digital growth—where are you seeing all this new traffic coming in from? Folio: For starters, to what do you attribute all of this growth in digital? Is there anything you’ve been doing differently? Some of our biggest stories in the past year have absolutely been magazine stories. We had an amazing run with Fader 100 where we had two incredible cover stories, but also just a ton of excellent content that we created for the magazine that’s all done really well online. We had an exciting cover story with Zayn Malik, which for The Fader was kind of a departure, but also super in line with the history of the best stuff The Fader does, which is to talk to an artist early on in a project and take time to learn where their head is at. That Zayn story was a classic Fader story, and we were happy to bring the Fader approach to a new audience with that one. For music and culture magazine The Fader, the end of 2015 saw the release of the brand’s landmark 100th issue, the digitization of its complete archive through a partnership with BitTorrent, and unprecedented digital growth. Combined traffic across desktop and mobile jumped 33 percent year-over-year, and October 2015, the month the 100th issue was released, was the highest-traffic month in the magazine’s sixteen-year history. Our goal has been to move away from that MP3 blog model. We saw so much potential in The Fader’s brand and the way that The Fader has always looked at music, which is using music as a prism to learn more about the entire world and youth culture and technology. It’s been a process both of staffing up and working with everyone here to improve day-to-day writing and editing skills. We’re still a small staff and we will lean on each other to create most of the content. To some extent, we’ve just been in blogging boot camp all together, and trying to do magazine-quality stuff every day. Folio: caught up with Naomi Zeichner, editor-in-chief, to get a glimpse of what’s behind The Fader’s growth and what’s next for the brand. Folio: Looking back at that Fader 100 issue, was featuring well-established stars like Drake or Rihanna a departure for the brand? Naomi Zeichner: We’ve been doing everything differently over the past year or so. I don’t mean to say we’ve switched our entire approach or model, but The Fader at its inception and for many years on the internet was a great MP3 blog; that was the bread and butter of our business, and then we had this separate magazine that we were doing, and those stories would also always go online, but there were only so many of them. Zeichner: The Fader has always been all about balance. I don’t think The Fader has ever shied away from pop music. Drake and Rihanna are both established artists, but also artists who constantly have their hands in what’s next in culture and are supporting or feeding off of young artists, so they’re very much in our world. It was about looking back, but we also think those artists are really vital and interesting right now. It was the same for Zayn; Zayn was a pop star who was actively trying to wheel himself back into a smaller, more meaningful world. We thought that was an interesting story and it says a lot about the status of the boundaries between indie and pop. Zeichner: Yes, we have each issue up for free download as part of our bundle now, and then you’ll be able to purchase the entire archive. I went to an art show recently where these kids had created a whole wall out of Fader photography that they got from the archive bundle when it was free, and that was a really cool moment for me. Some of our early magazines still exist in this office only on compact discs as quark files, so knowing that the archive was digitized and made available is really amazing. Zeichner: This year, we have a fuller stable of editors than ever. A joke that I make with my deputy is that we taught each other “folk journalism.” We aren’t people who went to journalism school, but all of a sudden we have this infusion of people who have worked at amazing places and are some of the best editors in the business. Their specialties aren’t only in music. They’re people who love music and love culture, but also are really ambitious writers about politics, sports, technology, identity—things like that. I’m looking forward to those editors both improving the overall quality of our magazine stories and also making sure that we have more non-music, high-quality stories that we’re breaking in our magazine, as well as just bringing in more freelancers and more people into the Fader network. Folio: Your BitTorrent partnership resulted in over one million downloads for the Fader 100 issue. Can we expect more promotions like that in the future? Zeichner: Not exactly, but we are thinking about how to use social platforms for native content. These days, when an artist visits the office, what we’re doing with them for our Snapchat story is one of the first things we think about. A few years ago when we did our redesign for our site, we built it mobile-first, and we’re going to introduce a couple of tweaks to the mobile design in a couple weeks, making sure that all of our articles—whether it’s a long-form magazine article or something that’s more newsy or more listy—is really pleasant to read on your phone, and that you’re able to easily navigate around the day’s content on your phone. That sort of user experience is really important to us, but we aren’t necessarily tailoring content towards social. Folio: What are some ways in which that affects your editorial strategy? Are you tailoring content for different social platforms? Zeichner: Just like other publishers, we’re seeing a ton of traffic directly from Facebok. For us, I would say Twitter is a larger audience than for some other publications, I think because music readers still hang out on Twitter, which is awesome. We’ve seen a huge increase in mobile traffic. We also see a lot of direct traffic, which is coming from people texting each other links, or when people put links in their Instagram bios, which for us is an exciting metric. Folio: So what’s next? How will you top those numbers in 2016? Zeichner: Absolutely. I think a print magazine cover at this point is such a feather in the hat. There are so few print magazine covers, and we’re just really proud that people still feel that a Fader cover, as a symbol, is a currency that they want to be a part of, and that it still means something. These distinctions between a high-brow thing and a low-brow thing, or a popular thing and an underground thing, might go away. Lots of publications are now operating with that understanding. Last year we saw huge traffic growth when we were able to meaningfully weigh in on a cultural moment. When Meek Mill and Drake were fighting, we had a million posts that were different from posts that you’d see elsewhere on the internet, and that’s where we really saw growth. Looking at things like the election, and even the Grammy’s coming up, we want to make sure that we have the best coverage and all different types of coverage. Now we have coverage coming from our UK office, and we also have someoene in Canada starting, so we’re looking forward to broadening the types of stories we tell. More on this topic The Fader Releases Full Archive on BitTorrent A Look at The FADER’s Expansion Plans Folio: Week in Review – January 30, 2016 How Runner’s World is Connecting with Audiences Like Never Before Inside Harvard Business Review’s Plans to Boost High-Frequency Traffic Selling Positivity: A Look Inside Condé Nast AuroraJust In Shanker Out, Litterick In as CEO of EnsembleIQ Four More Execs Depart SourceMedia in Latest Restructuring BabyCenter Sold to Ziff Davis Parent J2 Media | News & Notes The Atlantic Names New Global Marketing Head | People on the Move Meredith Corp. Makes Digital-Side Promotions | People on the Move This Just In: Magazines Are Not TV NetworksPowered bylast_img read more

first_imgOnline and on social media, heartbroken tributes to the 48-year-old Montana Magazine abounded from readers both at home and across the country.“It’s just a part of the Montana experience. It’s going to leave a big hole behind,” David McCumber, founder of the competing title Big Sky Journal, current editor of the Lee-owned Montana Standard and guest editor of the last five issues of Montana Magazine, told the Associated Press.In addition to its four Montana-based outlets, Iowa-based Lee Enterprises publishes some 40-plus newspapers across 20 states primarily in the Midwest and greater Rocky Mountains region—including the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Arizona Daily Star. The company claims to reach a combined 1.1 million daily readers in print and 30 million monthly uniques online.Very sad to be the last editor of a great magazine. I competed against Rick Graetz when I started @bigskyjournal in 1993, but always loved and admired the magazine he founded. Was honored to edit @MontanaMagazine for its last five issues. https://t.co/eWb8UTdr37— David McCumber (@dcmccumber) September 20, 2018 Montana Magazine, the bimonthly title which has chronicled Big Sky Country since its inaugural issue in 1970, has shut its doors after 48 years, publisher Lee Enterprises announced Wednesday.“Unfortunately, the dynamics of the publishing business have changed, and the magazine has reached the end of its distinguished run,” wrote the magazine’s general manager, Matt Gibson, in a note to readers. “All of us at Montana Magazine appreciate our loyal readers, and we’re sorry to disappoint so many of you.”The news comes about a week after Lee Enterprises abruptly shuttered another Montana title, the alt-weekly Missoula Independent, which Gibson sold to the company last year before accepting a GM role at Lee overseeing both it and Montana Magazine, as well as two other local outlets, The Missoulian and the Ravalli Republic.A spokesman for Lee Enterprises has not responded to questions about the specific circumstances that led to the Montana Magazine shutdown, whether the company had first pursued a sale of either title as it looks to reduce its $500 million in debt, or how many staffers were let go as a result of the closures.The Independent‘s shuttering, which occurred Sept. 11, prompted outrage on social media and even a protest outside the offices of the Lee-owned Missoulian, according to a staff report in the paper.Earlier that morning, staffers at the Independent—who had voted unanimously to unionize earlier this year—were informed that the newspaper was closed, effective immediately, and that they’d continue to receive salary and benefits for 30 days. They were instructed not to report to work and provided a phone number to call to schedule an appointment to retrieve their belongings from the office.last_img read more