first_imgPlayStation VR may get upgrades, but not necessarily when PS5 debuts. Sarah Tew/CNET VR headsets have been arriving in force in 2019, with new hardware from Oculus, Valve, and Vive. But Sony’s PlayStation VR, which debuted back in 2016, hasn’t made its next evolutionary leap yet. That time is coming, but it likely won’t be alongside the debut of the PlayStation 5.At Toronto’s Collison conference, Sony’s Global Head of R&D for PlayStation, Dominic Mallinson, sat down with CNET to discuss what’s on the horizon for PSVR, and what we might see next. None of these are guarantees, but they could be key features of PSVR’s next leap. Something wireless, and lighterThe PSVR has been a success story relative to other VR hardware, selling over 4.2 million headsets so far, but the PlayStation 4’s install base of 96.8 million dwarfs that. Mallinson admits PSVR “does need to evolve. It’s not quite there yet as a mass market proposition.” A key step could be making it easier and less cord-tangly. “We do want it to be lighter weight, and easier to put on, less cables, less mess.”But a wireless option could take the form of an add-on, instead of the default. “Wireless suffers from the issue of being expensive,” Mallinson says. “If you don’t care about cables, then it’s a lot cheaper than to have a wireless system. But at the same time, having wireless just makes you so much more free.”Recent patent filing reports show designs indicating a wireless headset. The current PlayStation VR is relatively bulky, and its tether and break-out box means gameplay needs to happen in close range of the PS4. Eye tracking is in playNo mainstream VR headsets use eye tracking yet, but eye tracking (or gaze tracking) is something that PlayStation’s actively considering, and Mallinson considers crucial. “That’s the one that excites me the most… I think there will come a point in time in the not too distant future when you cannot launch a VR headset without eye tracking.” It could have practical benefits, too: eye tracking can help reduce graphics load to make games perform better via a technique called foveated rendering, which could help a game console perform more like a high-end PC. “It’s a win-win in that respect,” says Mallinson. “For me it’s a pretty obvious technology.”45-sony-playstation-vr-2016.jpgPlayStation VR’s Move controllers date back to the PS3. Sarah Tew/CNET New controllersPart of the current PSVR design was always about getting to the lowest price possible, which meant using existing PlayStation Move controllers and PS4 cameras instead of VR-specific controllers (while PlayStation VR games can also use the standard DualShock 4, he says Move has won out slightly with developers). “We knew if we went back into the R&D labs and we did something brand-new, we could have created something better than PlayStation Move, but it would have cost more,” Mallinson says, but hints that a better solution is coming. “We do recognize that does need to be evolved, and in the future we will obviously replace it.”Could mixed reality be onboard?Sony’s not exploring making a HoloLens for gaming (as far as we know), but there’s a possibility that pass-through mixed reality using VR headset cameras could be a part of the picture. “In the future, it’s interesting to us,” Mallinson says. He sees incorporating real-world things into the VR headset, like the way Oculus Quest can draw magic boundaries while seeing the room with pass-through cameras, is better than trying to drop holograms into actual reality like Magic Leap. “If you are more interested in mixed reality for gaming applications, then I actually think video see through is more compelling and a lot less complicated.” Sony’s had experience with AR games before, going back to PlayStation 3 games like Wonderbook, or EyePet.Don’t expect a new PSVR to launch alongside PS5Mallinson seems satisfied with how PlayStation VR rolled out several years after the PlayStation 4 was on the market. The current PSVR will be PS5-compatible, which means a new headset isn’t necessary right away. And that could mean Sony waits to debut a new headset for a while. “There’s no reason for us to coincide it with a new console. From the point of view of the consumer, to be bombarded with many many things — oh, you have to buy this, you have to buy that — is a message that we don’t want to send. In some ways, it’s good to have a little breathing space between those things.”Don’t expect a mobile VR standalone system, either Mallinson admires Oculus Quest, Facebook’s new standalone console-free VR system, but doesn’t see Sony taking a similar path yet. “I do applaud them for doing something that is mobile, but it’s something you would more likely do in a private living room space. I don’t think you’d go out on the road and do this stuff. But I think having no wires, making it light and unencumbered, it is great. So I think going mobile for both reasons is important.”New VR headset or not, VR is gaining tractionWhile developer interest is high, says Mallinson, the audience is smaller and Sony is still looking to grow the audience. “The fact of life is, you get a little less in terms of commercial movement from the VR titles.”But he sees VR as finally becoming a platform that can work. Sony’s recent lineup of VR games has been impressive and some of the PlayStation’s best games of 2018 (Moss, Tetris Effect, Astro Bot: Rescue Mission) were VR titles. “We’re just reaching that level now where, as a developer you can say, ‘OK, I can make money. It’s not easy, but I can now make money.'” Virtual Reality Sony Gaming Wearable Tech 1 Share your voice Comment Tagslast_img read more

first_imgThe High Court will deliver its verdict on the death references and appeals in the sensational Narayanganj seven-murder cases, reports news agency UNB.The HC bench of justice Bhabani Prasad Singha and justice Mustafa Zaman Islam is expected to announce the verdict today (Tuesday).Earlier on 26 July, the HC bench fixed 13 August for delivering its verdict on completion of the hearing from both the prosecution and defence sides.It changed the date for delivering the verdict on the death references and appeals of 26 death-row convicts in two cases filed over Narayanganj seven-murder and fixed today (Tuesday) for verdict.The HC started hearing on the death reference and appeals on 22 May, filed by 26 condemned convicts in two cases lodged over the seven-murder incident.The paper book and all documents related to the murder cases were sent to the High Court on 7 May.A court of Narayanganj on 16 January last sentenced 26 people, including three sacked RAB officials and ex-city councillor Nur Hossain, to death and nine others to different jail terms in the two cases filed over the sensational seven-murder incident.On 27 April 2014, Narayanganj panel mayor Nazrul Islam, his three associates and driver were abducted from Fatullah area of Narayanganj.At the same time, senior lawyer at the District Judge’s Court Chandan Kumar Sarkar and his driver were abducted on their way to the capital.Three days after their abduction, the bodies of six including Nazrul and Chandan, were recovered from the Shitalakhya River.The following day, the body of Nazrul’s car driver Jahangir was recovered from the river.Later, Selina Islam Beauty, the widow of Nazrul Islam, filed a case against six people while advocate Chandan Sarkar’s son-in-law filed the other case.last_img read more

first_imgOptical images of two types of MoTe2 monolayer samples: (a) MoTe2 flakes that were highly luminescent to begin with maintain their brightness over the 8-day observation period; (b) MoTe2 flakes that were weakly luminescent at the start fade within a few days, and parts of them seem to disappear altogether. Credit: Bin Chen, et al. ©2015 American Chemical Society Defects in 2D semiconductors could lead to multi-colored light-emitting devices The researchers, led by Sefaattin Tongay, Assistant Professor at Arizona State University, have published a paper on the changing luminescence in a recent issue of ACS Nano.”Currently, many researchers throughout the world are demonstrating very impressive and promising proof-of-concept applications using 2D material systems, but we still do not know their material stability over long periods of time,” Tongay told Phys.org. “This research presents the unique case of MoTe2, the only infrared-range TMD, where monolayers visually disappear but are physically still there.”Like other TMDs, MoTe2 stands out for its interesting optical properties. In bulk form, TMDs are not luminescent, but when one-atom-layer-thick flakes are exfoliated from the bulk, the 2D flakes become semiconductors and emit light rather strongly. For this reason, 2D semiconducting TMDs could have applications in optoelectronics and solar energy conversion technologies. As the only TMD that has an infrared-range band gap, MoTe2 is particularly suitable for infrared detectors and tunnel field-effect transistors.Because 2D materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio, their properties can be affected by interactions between their surface and the environment. Noting that tellurium compounds are particularly sensitive to oxygen, the researchers here wanted to investigate what happens when monolayer MoTe2 is exposed to oxygen for several days. The researchers propose that the reason why the weakly luminescent flakes seem to disappear is that they have a large number of defects, particularly vacancies due to missing atoms. These vacancies are why the flakes have a low starting luminescence, and also explain why they lose their luminescence when exposed to oxygen. Oxygen molecules (O2) from the air become embedded in these defects and bind to Mo and Te, forming “deep states” that basically trap electrons and holes, effectively prohibiting luminescence. On the other hand, flakes that are highly luminescent to begin with have a small number of defects, so they don’t absorb nearly as many oxygen molecules, don’t suffer loss of luminescence, and their optical properties remain close to their properties under vacuum conditions.”This work shows that a slim amount of defects in MoTe2 can have a great impact on their material properties, such as optical, electrical, and vibrational, and these changes occur gradually over time similar to aging wine: depending on the defect concentration, MoTe2 monolayers can spoil over time (or might get better),” Tongay explained.The results here show that the defects play a significant role in the optical properties and stability of MoTe2, and could also reveal insight into the environmental stability of other 2D materials, such as silicene (2D silicon), phosphorene (2D phosphorous), and other TMDs. It could also lead to ways to control these materials’ properties. (Phys.org)—When exposed to air, a luminescent 2D material called molybdenum telluride (MoTe2) appears to decompose within a couple days, losing its optical contrast and becoming virtually transparent. But when scientists probed further, they found that the disappearance is an illusion: the material remains structurally stable, and only its material properties change. The results reveal insight into the environmental stability and unusual properties of a newer class of 2D materials called transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Citation: Two-dimensional material seems to disappear, but doesn’t (2015, May 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-two-dimensional-material-doesnt.html Explore further © 2015 Phys.org More information: Bin Chen, Hasan Sahin, et al. “Environmental Changes in MoTe2 Excitonic Dynamics by Defects-Activated Molecular Interaction.” ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b00985 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Left to right) Postdoc Aslihan Suslu, PhD student Bin Chen, and Assistant Professor Sefaattin Tongay have investigated the material stability and optical properties of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which have potential applications in optoelectronics and other areas. Credit: Sefaattin Tongay Journal information: ACS Nano Play Monolayer MoTe2 is visually disappearing in this video recorded over a 7-day period. However, atomic force microscopy measurements reveal that the material is indeed still there; it physically exists, and only its optical properties change. Credit: Sefaattin Tongay The researchers began by observing the material under an optical microscope with an infrared lens. They found that MoTe2 flakes that were highly luminescent to begin with maintained their brightness over the 8-day observation period. On the other hand, weakly luminescent flakes unexpectedly appeared to fade within 1-3 days, and parts of them disappeared altogether. However, when viewing the “vanishing” flakes using an atomic force microscope (AFM), which scans samples mechanically rather than optically, the researchers saw the flakes “reappear.” The flakes had never disappeared in the first place, but their optical properties had changed while their chemical structure was maintained. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “This is an important discovery in that it practically implies that we are able to tune the optical properties of 2D MoTe2 by manipulating the defect density in the material and preventing the material from losing its intrinsic attributes by improving the quality of crystal,” said Bin Chen, PhD student at Arizona State University and lead author of the paper.In the future, the researchers plan to explore and establish the stability of other 2D material systems, as well as boost their properties by molecular functionalization through existing or intentionally created defect points. “Despite encouraging results and impressive applications, our results point toward environmental instability over a time period of a month,” Chen said. “We hope to understand this and ideally overcome these challenges using our knowledge and expertise in materials science and engineering.”last_img read more