first_imgWhat’s more, as Dan Roth, Executive Editor of LinkedIn, shared in his keynote at FOLIO:’s MediaNext conference, “the vast majority of readers leverage media as a means to put forth a view, interests, and opinions to their network to generate interaction and help develop their social and professional connections and standing.” The role of the media is to be a conversation starter, and LinkedIn is an ideal forum.Here are five reasons to stay up-to-date with LinkedIn:1. A new audience is waiting to consume your content—the platform has 225 million unique global users.2. You can mine for leads and industry news on the site, in a number of ways: LinkedIn Today is a hub for custom content sharing. Channels allow users to receive tailored news and sift through stories. There’s the option to “follow” Influencers who opine on trends and share actionable business tips.  Global leaders, from Jack Welch to Sir Richard Branson (who has 1.8 million followers as a LinkedIn influencer vs. 402K followers on Facebook) have amassed loyal followings. 3. There’s an opportunity for increased brand awareness. Starting a company page is a relatively low lift and puts your content right in front of readers. Are you a lifestyle brand? Consider sharing your career-related content or “big think” pieces at key moments in time (i.e. graduation). Real estate b-to-b publication? LinkedIn is an excellent vehicle for sharing insight on REITs and mortgage interest rates, as well as educating potential customers on your products and services. Long story short: Position yourself as a thought-leader. 4. LinkedIn can “drive enough traffic to crash your servers.” Add LinkedIn share buttons on your website and share your own content at least once a day. Roth says that the more content is shared, the more LinkedIn’s algorithms view it as “important to the business community” and it will surface on the homepage. 5. You can connect with your readers. Start a group and host monthly discussions with those who join. The logistics and quality of comments is more fluid on LinkedIn than on Facebook, for example. Check out these brands for thought-starters on how you can leverage LinkedIn for your publication:The EconomistNBC NewsThe Walt Disney CompanyGoogleWho do you follow on LinkedIn? What Influencers do you find insightful? Tweet me @StephaniePaige. This month, LinkedIn celebrated its 10th birthday (that’s two more years than YouTube) and within the past decade, the social media network for professionals has really grown up. What was once viewed as solely a job-hunting destination has now evolved into a multi-faceted media channel, a place to consume thought-provoking content, digest POVs and commentary from industry leaders, share articles and access updates on-the-go via the beautifully designed LinkedIn app. But you may be asking yourself: Why publish content on LinkedIn when your brand already shares on Facebook? First, it’s another platform for your content, which is always a good thing. But second, remember that social media channels have unique offerings: What works on Twitter doesn’t work on Instagram. Your followers (likely) vary per channel, so naturally you’ll want to share content that resonates with the specific audience you’re targeting. LinkedIn users are engaged and hungry for smart content, and unlike Facebook followers, are less worried about being entertained and more interested in learning something.  last_img read more

first_imgSome News Plus magazines — like Wired, shown here on the left — are beautifully formatted for phone screens. Others, like Consumer Reports, are just scans, which require a lot of zooming and scrolling — not a great reading experience. Screenshot by Rick Broida/CNET I love magazines. Always have. I even started one years ago, a ‘zine dedicated to PalmPilot users. There’s just something about a curated collection of topic-oriented content, carefully written and nicely formatted, that makes my brain light up.Unsurprisingly, I was a fan of the Texture “Netflix for magazines” subscription service. When Apple acquired Texture last year, I was cautiously optimistic. More content? A better reading experience on my phone?The answer arrived earlier this week in the form of News Plus, which effectively blends Texture into Apple’s News app. The price: $9.99 per month for unlimited access to over 300 magazines. That’s just shy of $120 per year.That’s a lot of content — but is News Plus really a good value? Like CNET’s Scott Stein, I find myself suffering from subscription fatigue. On top of Hulu, Netflix, Spotify and everything else, can I really justify another monthly fee? Can you?Apple News Plus: Crunching the numbersAs noted, I love magazines, and I read a fair number of them. In fact, I read them mostly on my iPad, in part because it’s convenient, and in part because most digital mags aren’t well formatted for phone viewing. It’s either all text or a lot of zooming and scrolling around a PDF scan.So I’m definitely the target audience for News Plus. But I’m also the Cheapskate, so this needs to be a better deal than I can get on my own.I started by making a list of all the magazines I read regularly. Turns out there are eight of them, including Consumer Reports, Entertainment Weekly, Money, Time and Wired.Then I went to Magazines.com, noted the current annual subscription price for each and added up the numbers. Total: $180. I’ll admit, that kind of took me by surprise. Of course, subscriptions go on sale all the time, and you can usually score pretty hefty cash-back savings. My real-world number might be lower, but I needed to start somewhere.magazines-com-veep-subscriptionA one-year subscription to Entertainment Weekly costs $35 all by itself. That’s nearly a third of the annual price of News Plus — for just one magazine. Screenshot by Rick Broida/CNET And right there, News Plus would already be a solid deal. Even if I’m actually spending more like $100 per year on magazines, I’d choose the slightly higher cost of News Plus. Because now we factor in the magazines I would read if they were free. Which they effectively would be here.That list includes titles like Bon Appetit, Make, The New Yorker and a handful of others. I’ll just pause here to note that a one-year New Yorker subscription alone costs $100. So if that one’s anywhere on your must-read list, News Plus will nearly pay for itself.Of course, all these numbers are mine and mine alone. You probably have a different list of magazines you like, and I suspect few folks subscribe to as many as I do. So $10 per month might not be worth it at all.In fact, there’s a News Plus alternative you should absolutely consider: Your public library.Apple News Plus alternatives: Free digital magazines from the library and AmazonBefore you pull the trigger on a News Plus subscription, see how many of your favorite magazines are available for free. Yep, free: Many public libraries have partnered with RBDigital, which lets you “check out” digital editions of hundreds of periodicals.Read more: How to get free digital magazines from your libraryThen there’s Amazon: If you’re a Prime subscriber, you can access a small, rotating selection of magazines and read them for free via your Fire tablet or Kindle app. Obviously the Prime subscription itself isn’t free, but the magazines are one of the various subscription benefits.amazon-prime-reading-magazine-selectionAmazon Prime subscribers get access to handful of digital mags at no extra charge. Screenshot by Rick Broida/CNET As you might expect, these options have their limitations. Amazon’s freebie library is small — there are currently just 15 titles, which frequently change — and the reading experience isn’t great, at least in the Kindle app on my iPad. The page scans seem a little low-resolution, and the text view is often a weird mish-mash of text and images.As for RBDigital, the app suffers from a mediocre user interface, slow downloads and frequent glitches.But, hey, it’s free. And the library has at least one magazine News Plus doesn’t: Cooks Illustrated, which I read religiously. The News Plus value propositionSo is News Plus worth it? Taken at face value, $10 per month for 300 magazines is a terrific deal, especially considering how nicely formatted many of them are for smaller screens.But in its current state, it’s buggy (some magazines I’ve downloaded don’t appear in “My Magazines”) and limited (there’s not even a search function, for heaven’s sake), and it’s quite jarring (and annoying) when you come across a magazine that isn’t formatted for mobile. (A lot of them are just straight-up PDFs, at least for now.)If you really love magazines, I suspect you’ll like News Plus. At the very least, try out the month-long free trial period. And there’s no contract, so you can always opt to cancel if you find yourself not using it a few months in.If you read only a few here and there, however, I definitely recommend pursuing the library and Amazon options. The Cheapskate Review • Apple iPad 2018 review: The iPad for everyone Best Buy Comments See it Apple 7 See It Tags • Share your voice CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors $329 reading • I did the math, and Apple News Plus is actually a pretty good deal See It CNET’s Cheapskate scours the web for great deals on PCs, phones, gadgets and much more. Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page. Questions about the Cheapskate blog? Find the answers on our FAQ page. Find more great buys on the CNET Deals page and follow the Cheapskate on Facebook and Twitter! Apple See It 2:00 $249 Aug 31 • Best places to sell your used electronics in 2019 $249 Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Amazon See All Now playing: Watch this: $249 Mentioned Above Apple iPad 2018 (space gray, 32GB) Apple iPad How to get started with Apple News Plus Digital Media Amazon Applelast_img read more

first_imgin all seriousness, Gaga is the greatest inspiration in my life. Her and Bradley choosing me for that tiny little scene was an indescribable honor. She makes me want to be better every single day. Her courage and talent and vision are one of a kind. I stan her to my grave.— h (@halsey) February 25, 2019 When you come to the Oscars, you must dress up. Thanks @CSiriano for creating this custom couture masterpiece. @OscarHeymanBros you have outdone yourselves with your iconic jewels. Style by @sammyratelle Grooming by Anna Bernabe. @TheAcademy #AcademyAwards2019 #oscars #oscars2019 pic.twitter.com/IpTG2OK20x— Billy Porter (@theebillyporter) February 24, 2019 ACADEMY! AWARD! WINNER! LADY! GAGA!— tyler oakley (@tyleroakley) February 25, 2019 Popular on Variety 3 Men And A Lady ❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️ pic.twitter.com/o9SCXtPT4f— Mark Ronson (@MarkRonson) February 25, 2019On the red carpet, top five most talked-about Oscars fashion looks on Facebook were: Billy Porter wearing a Christian Siriano tuxedo dress; Jason Momoa’s pink velvet tux and matching scrunchie; Jennifer Lopez’s mirror-mosaic gown; Lady Gaga’s 128-carat Tiffany diamond necklace; and Spike Lee’s custom metallic-gold Jordan 3 sneakers.On Twitter, Gaga garnered the most activity from the red carpet, but she didn’t herself take to social media over Oscars weekend. The most-retweeted celebrity tweet from this year’s Oscars was from Porter, star of FX’s “Pose,” showing off his billowing black dress:center_img On Twitter, the most-tweeted moments were similar: “Green Book” took the No. 1 spot, followed by “Shallow” winning original song, Malek’s win, Gaga-Cooper’s performance, and Olivia Colman snagging the best actress trophy for “The Favourite.”Lady Gaga was the most tweeted-about celebrity of the night, followed by Bradley Cooper, Rami Malek, Alfonso Cuarón and Spike Lee. Gaga’s star shone brightly as ABC’s Oscars broadcast went hostless, after Kevin Hart’s controversial exit.Spike Lee, whose “BlacKkKlansman” won the Oscar for adapted screenplay, generated the most controversy of the night after he angrily tried to leave the auditorium after “Green Book” picked up the best-picture Oscar and delivering an acceptance speech that drew a Monday-morning response on Twitter from Donald Trump.Celebs tweeting huzzahs to Lady Gaga for her Oscars win and performance with Cooper included “Shallow” co-writer Mark Ronson: Lady Gaga struck the biggest chord with Oscars viewers Sunday night, capturing the lion’s share of chatter related to the 91st Academy Awards on social media.Gaga’s first Oscar win — for the song “Shallow” from “A Star Is Born,” which she performed with Bradley Cooper on the ABC telecast — gave her three of the evening’s five top moments on Facebook and made her the most-tweeted-about celeb, according to the companies.Per Facebook, the five most talked-about Oscar moments on Feb. 24 were: “Green Book” winning best picture, followed by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s intimate performance of “Shallow.” Next was Rami Malek’s best-actor win for “Bohemian Rhapsody,” followed by Gaga’s acceptance speech for “Shallow” and Alfonso Cuarón’s “Roma” winning foreign language film. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more