first_img This year, the trend continues with the loss in sales in smaller retailers and the declining sales of smaller titles. This has a huge influence on the overall sales numbers; there were more than 8,000 fewer retail accounts being serviced in the first quarter of this year in contrast to last. The top ten chains in Q1 2015 represented 53.3 percent of total sales, compared to a collective market share of 51.8 percent in 2014. This is a trend that will likely continue as smaller retail stores exit the business. Although there will likely be no major turnaround in the foreseeable future, MagNet notes that decisions being made by publishers to reduce their allocations, partially driven by wholesaler demands for subsidies, are having a substantial impact on the steady sales decline. That comes in addition to the rise in social media and mobile technology in influencing how consumers view and absorb content. The Top 100 chains’ combined sales beat the overall business trends, which again indicates that the industry is losing smaller retailers. But the publishers who performed well in the first quarter all followed the same formula: more releases. Many of these publishers also tacked on higher cover prices, like Penny Press, which had 13 percent more releases, and an average cover price increase of about 23 percent.  Time Inc.’s numbers benefitted from more book-a-zine releases under their THEI brand, as well as the higher cover price on People. Harris Publications also increased their number of releases and focused more on book-a-zine products. Overall, the average cover price of a unit sold in the first quarter increased by 36 cents (more than 7 percent). Two factors contributed to this jump: 1) higher cover prices on many of the weekly titles, and 2) the continued publisher focus on book-a-zines with cover prices startingat $9.99. These factors helped drive the average cover price on a unit sold to an all-time high, which is one of the few good signs for the industry—consumers are willing to pay higher prices for quality printed magazines. center_img Although it’s easy to fall back on saying “social media is to blame,” publishers also need to reassess their releases—how often to distribute and how much are they going to charge according to MagNet’s 2015 Q1 Newsstand Sales Results. Magazine unit and dollar sales improved slightly in the first quarter to declines of 14.2 percent and 8.3 percent, respectively, compared to drops of 15.6 percent and 9 percent in the prior quarter. The average dollar sales decline of the Top 25 titles was mitigated this quarter by the higher cover prices on the weekly titles. Even though the newsstand sales environment is bleak, decisions being made by publishers have a major impact. So keep producing quality content but perhaps release it in a higher quality product and quit reducing your allocations, as MagNet suggests doing the opposite has proven to only be beneficial.last_img read more

first_imgOnline and on social media, heartbroken tributes to the 48-year-old Montana Magazine abounded from readers both at home and across the country.“It’s just a part of the Montana experience. It’s going to leave a big hole behind,” David McCumber, founder of the competing title Big Sky Journal, current editor of the Lee-owned Montana Standard and guest editor of the last five issues of Montana Magazine, told the Associated Press.In addition to its four Montana-based outlets, Iowa-based Lee Enterprises publishes some 40-plus newspapers across 20 states primarily in the Midwest and greater Rocky Mountains region—including the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and Arizona Daily Star. The company claims to reach a combined 1.1 million daily readers in print and 30 million monthly uniques online.Very sad to be the last editor of a great magazine. I competed against Rick Graetz when I started @bigskyjournal in 1993, but always loved and admired the magazine he founded. Was honored to edit @MontanaMagazine for its last five issues. https://t.co/eWb8UTdr37— David McCumber (@dcmccumber) September 20, 2018 Montana Magazine, the bimonthly title which has chronicled Big Sky Country since its inaugural issue in 1970, has shut its doors after 48 years, publisher Lee Enterprises announced Wednesday.“Unfortunately, the dynamics of the publishing business have changed, and the magazine has reached the end of its distinguished run,” wrote the magazine’s general manager, Matt Gibson, in a note to readers. “All of us at Montana Magazine appreciate our loyal readers, and we’re sorry to disappoint so many of you.”The news comes about a week after Lee Enterprises abruptly shuttered another Montana title, the alt-weekly Missoula Independent, which Gibson sold to the company last year before accepting a GM role at Lee overseeing both it and Montana Magazine, as well as two other local outlets, The Missoulian and the Ravalli Republic.A spokesman for Lee Enterprises has not responded to questions about the specific circumstances that led to the Montana Magazine shutdown, whether the company had first pursued a sale of either title as it looks to reduce its $500 million in debt, or how many staffers were let go as a result of the closures.The Independent‘s shuttering, which occurred Sept. 11, prompted outrage on social media and even a protest outside the offices of the Lee-owned Missoulian, according to a staff report in the paper.Earlier that morning, staffers at the Independent—who had voted unanimously to unionize earlier this year—were informed that the newspaper was closed, effective immediately, and that they’d continue to receive salary and benefits for 30 days. They were instructed not to report to work and provided a phone number to call to schedule an appointment to retrieve their belongings from the office.last_img read more

first_img All the cool new gadgets at CES 2019 Angela Lang/CNET Smart mirrors are popping up everywhere at CES 2019 and Capstone Connected Home is jumping in the game with a Google Assistant-enabled model. The touchscreen mirror allows you to download apps from the Google Play store, stream YouTube and ask Google Assistant anything you would in a standard smart speaker. You can also compose emails and messages by typing directly on the mirror. Voice control in the mirror can recognize six different voices and log users in and out of Google accounts. The company says this method still keeps user data private. The mirror does require the Capstone Connected Control Hub. The hub is also a touchscreen device, like a tablet, that acts as the command center for the mirror. You can hang the Capstone Smart Mirror or stand it up on a counter. The mirror will be available in multiple sizes, beginning with a 19-inch by 22-inch model in early 2019. Pricing information is not yet available.  Google Assistant CES Products Google CES 2019 0 Share your voice Post a comment Tags 85 Photos CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show. CES schedule: It’s six days of jam-packed events. Here’s what to expect. Smart Homelast_img read more

first_imggasResidents of certain parts of the capital had a rather difficult morning as there was no gas supply, preventing them from even cooking breakfast at home.Residents of Rampura, Banasree, Mahanagar Project, Khilgaon and its adjacent areas on Monday said gas supply in the areas were cut without any prior notice.Titas emergency control room said a six inch gas supply pipe was damaged in east Rampura during repair work on Sunday.The gas supply in the affected areas will be restored by Monday afternoon, according to the Titas emergency control room.last_img read more

first_imgIt’s only in a work of art can you expect life being breathed into the dying. Shovan Gandhi, a Delhi based photographer, in his work Alang has done just the same.  Being a part of the bigger picture – Pix – a photo quarterly, Gandhi has portrayed Habitat through this endeavor along with fifteen other artists. Alang is a journey of ships, starting from the day they are born to the waves they crash and land to their graveyard and even beyond. It tries to encapsulate the experiences the ships go through throughout their life and finally end up in this ship breaking centre in Gujarat. He compares, not the life of a ship to that of a man, but vice-versa. One cannot ignore the idea glaring through his pictures that each man-made thing has to come to an end. Once worn out, nothing can keep the drums rolling, or here, the ships sailing. Though ‘philosophical’, it asks the question of death and birth; of waste from value and conversely.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Alang also portrays the journey, its end and a new beginning. The lines by T. S. Eliot, ‘What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from,’ fits Alang beautifully. It shows not only how the once mighty ships sailing the economies of the world come to rest in peace, but also how their end marks a new beginning for scrap collectors. For truly, there never is an end.  The project has attracted various view points from various fields of ecology, architecture and finance. Not being faced with a criticism yet, Shovan has tried to highlight the prevailing socio-cultural ecosystem in which, according to him, ‘unimportant men can aggregate and die so that dead ships live.’ Drawing influence from architecture and fine art, Gandhi wishes there would be more platforms in the country for display of photographs and art. He expects to present a new project in the following year.WHERE: Goethe-Institute, Maxmuller Bhawan, New DelhiWHEN: When: 9 to 16 May, 7:00 pm to 9:30 pmlast_img read more